Technologies
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WARF: P090407US01

  • Assigned to WARF as biological material.

Inbred Corn Lines for Developing Silage Hybrids


INVENTORS -

Natalia de Leon Gatti, James Coors, Dustin Eilert, Patrick Flannery

The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) is seeking commercial partners interested in superior inbred corn lines for the development of silage hybrids.
OVERVIEWCorn silage is a high quality forage crop used on many dairy and cattle farms. The goal of making silage is to preserve the harvested crop by anaerobic fermentation, where bacteria convert soluble carbohydrates into acetic and lactic acid. To obtain high quality silage, it's important to start with a crop variety that has high grain and high forage yield.
THE INVENTIONA team of UW-Madison researchers has developed several inbred lines of corn that are useful for producing silage hybrids. The lines have been tested extensively and detailed yield and compositional data are available.  Line characteristics include superior forage yield potential, high in vitro true digestibility, high in vitro neutral detergent fiber digestibility, high protein and starch content, low neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber content, good stalk quality and/or relatively early maturity.
APPLICATIONS
  • Development of high quality hybrids for silage production
KEY BENEFITS
  • Lines demonstrated several beneficial characteristics, including superior forage yield, high digestibility, high protein content, good stalk quality and/or early maturity.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
For More Information About the Inventors
Contact Information
For current licensing status, please contact Emily Bauer at emily@warf.org or (608) 262-8638.
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Since its founding in 1925 as the patenting and licensing organization for the University of Wisconsin-Madison, WARF has been working with business and industry to transform university research into products that benefit society. WARF intellectual property managers and licensing staff members are leaders in the field of university-based technology transfer. They are familiar with the intricacies of patenting, have worked with researchers in relevant disciplines, understand industries and markets, and have negotiated innovative licensing strategies to meet the individual needs of business clients.