Technologies

Engineering

Engineering Portfolios

Most Recent Inventions

Building Framing System with Innovative Snap-in Track for Residential and Commercial Construction

An inventor who is an alumnus of UW-Fond du Lac has developed a building framing system for fast and easy construction of interior non-load-bearing walls. The unique design of the system allows a series of studs to be temporarily secured without fasteners, until sheetrock or other face material can be applied. The system does not need to be secured against sidewalls, and can accommodate both wood and metal studs, which can easily be removed and adjusted as needed. The system is flexible and can secure studs that vary in length by up to ½”. This technology offers a user-friendly tool for experienced construction professionals or for home improvement projects such as do-it-yourself basement finishing.
T160038US01

3-D Printer for High Quality, Large-Scale Metal Parts

UW–Madison researchers have developed a linear multisource 3-D printer capable of producing large, fully dense metal parts with micron resolution.

The highly practical design employs a mechanically scanned cathode comb, large metal powder bed and vacuum. The design ensures a tightly controlled focal spot size, minimizes the number of beam sources, produces large parts at full density and requires little or no post processing because of the high resolution print head.
P150236US01

More Efficient Laminate Analysis

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method for analyzing composite laminate structures that combines the generality of 3-D FEA and efficiency of 2-D FEA whenever it is applicable. The new method works by substituting the laminate layers with much simpler virtual material models having matching characteristics (e.g., overall material properties and relationship between stresses and strains). The updated model can then by analyzed via fully automated 3-D FEA.

The virtual models may be referred to as ABD-equivalent models, as they result in the same ABD stiffness matrices as the real laminate and can act as substitutes if plate-shell assumptions apply.
P140408US01

Most Recent Patents

Environmentally Green Glue

UW–Madison researchers have developed a process to transform soy flour into a strong, environmentally safe wood adhesive.

In the process, a suitable reagent is used to phosphorylate the flour’s lysine amino acid residues. The phosphorylated flour then is mixed with an oxidizing agent that drives the formation of cross-linking bonds. This improves the flour’s adhesive properties. Unwanted salts created in the process can be removed.

Flours of other legumes and/or oil seed crops (e.g., flax, canola) are suitable as well.
P130276US02

Dynamic Predictor Improves Machine Control

The researcher now has developed a new dynamic predictor that rapidly and accurately calculates the motion trajectory of a system that is only partially constrained by joint inputs. This dynamic predictor achieves stable and accurate results for stiff systems. To do this, the predictor applies conditions achieving such results at both a first and second joint position at the start and end of a motion time step.

More specifically, the relationship between joints is described as a differential equation to be solved by the predictor. The predictor parameterizes the motion of the unconstrained joints in such a way as to match the conditions the solution needs to satisfy at both the start and end of a motion time step. As this parameterization is expressed by polynomial coefficients, motions of the remaining joints are readily determined by the kinematic predictor.
P130307US01

New Rheometer and Method for Efficiently Measuring Yield Stress in Biomass

UW–Madison researchers have developed a device and a method for measuring rheological properties of fluid that will effectively determine the yield stress of biomass materials. These measurements do not alter the material sample prior to measurement, allowing for more accurate data results and characterization.

The device comprises a cavity for receiving the fluid, an auger connected with an axial shaft, and a load cell sensor connected to the auger. The sensor measures the force on the auger from the fluid as the auger moves up and down. A linkage interconnected to the sensor translates motion to the auger.
P110311US01