Through Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,600 patented technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

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New Inventions

Treating Hemophilia B with Modified Protein

A UW–Madison researcher has developed new Factor IX mutants for treating blood coagulation conditions, including hemophilia B, hemorrhagic disorder and thrombosis. The modified proteins contain combined mutations in the heparin and antithrombin binding sites that prolong half-life and stability.

The new mutants show improved in vivo activity and more sustained therapeutic effect than naturally occurring Factor IX. They could potentially be administered intravenously, orally or by another route.

Treating Iron Overload with Block Copolymers

UW–Madison researchers have developed new block copolymers for forming micelles that can respond to the oxidation state of their environment and chelate iron (II) and (III) ions. At suitable concentrations the copolymers can form micelles to prolong circulation in the blood and bind to non-transferrin bound iron. The micelles then break up in cells in the presence of oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide and are cleared from the body by the liver or kidney route.

The copolymers include a polyhydroxamic acid-containing block and a polyferrocenyl block. They can be prepared by standard peptide synthesis or polymerization methods.

Modified Yeast with Enhanced Tolerance for GVL Biomass Solvent

UW–Madison researchers have developed a genetically modified strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is more resistant to GVL toxicity and grows more than 1.5 times faster than wild yeast in the presence of GVL.

The researchers deleted two genes (Pad1p and Fdc1p) in the yeast that play a role in mediating GVL tolerance. The new strain is the first ethanol-producing yeast specifically tailored for GVL-based techniques.

Sustainable Process to Remediate Liquid Waste Streams

UW–Madison researchers have developed an environmentally sound and cost-effective system to remediate effluent streams containing organometallic/inorganometallic contaminants. Metals are recovered in the process and the treated water can be recycled for industrial applications.

The system includes units for electro-oxidation, electro-deposition and electro-adsorption. These units work sequentially to (1) break the strong chemical bonds in the waste stream, (2) recover the heavy metal ions and (3) remediate the organic/inorganic material.

A primary advantage of the new system is the redesigned electro-deposition unit, which houses a concentrating cathode and helps in the recovery of metals present even in very low concentrations in a reusable form.

Synthesizing Natural Products to Treat High Blood Cholesterol

UW–Madison researchers have developed an efficient method to synthesize indole compounds, specifically polysubstituted dimeric indoles. These compounds have potential health benefits because they are able to reduce the amount of PCSK9 in cells. PCSK9 is an enzyme known to play a major role in controlling the concentration of LDL cholesterol in the bloodstream.

Some of the compounds have been tested in vitro for their ability to increase the secretion of a potent blood sugar hormone in the body called glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Others have the ability to selectively inhibit the secretion of interleukin-17 (IL-17), which is essential in many autoimmune diseases including arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease.

The synthesis process involves a cascade reaction with transition metal catalysts. The resulting compounds can be further functionalized to yield more substituted indoles.
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New Patents

Statistical Imaging Reconstruction Is Faster, Cuts Noise

A UW–Madison researchers has developed an iterative reconstruction method that simultaneously achieves high convergence speed and high parallelizability. The method can work with various medical imaging systems, including CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray angiography and positron emission tomography (PET).

In general, a nonlinear reconstruction problem is decomposed into separate linear sub-problems that can be solved more efficiently. The statistical image reconstruction process is decomposed into a statistically weighted algebraic reconstruction update sequence. After this step, the image is de-noised using a regularization function.

Improved Infrared-Responsive Hydrogel for Use in Microfluidics and Optics

UW–Madison researchers have developed an improved infrared-responsive hydrogel by incorporating graphene oxide flakes into a thermo-responsive hydrogel polymer. These composite hydrogels have an intrinsically higher surface area and absorbance band than conventional metal nanoparticles, resulting in a larger volumetric change in response to infrared light. The researchers also have provided a microfluidic device and a lens structure that incorporate these composite hydrogels as actuators. Both devices can be operated by heating the composite hydrogel in its swollen state to a temperature sufficient enough to shrink its volume. The hydrogel can be restored to its original volume by allowing it to cool and re-swell. In the microfluidic device volume reduction of the hydrogel allows fluid to flow through a channel and in the lens structure volume change relates to a change in focal length. 

Designing Ubiquitin Oligomers

UW–Madison researchers have developed methods for synthesizing oligomers of Ub and Ub-like polypeptides with a well-defined number of Ub units. The oligomers are constructed using thioether groups rather than the natural isopeptide linkages. The thioether groups may be designed to closely mimic the native isopeptide or may be varied.

Methods for preparing and coupling Ub building blocks (i.e., monomers) also are provided.
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