Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,700 technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

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New Inventions

Compound Combination Targets Bacterial Virulence

The researchers have discovered that two lead compounds (E22/M64) can be combined to target multiple QS pathways at the same time (Rhl/Pqs), resulting in enhanced activity against P. aeruginosa and potentially other pathogens. This new cocktail approach is superior because it attenuates virulence factor production across a range of relevant environments where single compounds fail.
P160176US02

Inhibiting Metadherin/SND1 Interaction to Treat Cancer

UW–Madison researchers and collaborators have developed a method to fight tumor growth and metastasis using novel peptides that inhibit interaction between MTDH and a protein called SND1.

The researchers found that MTDH-SND1 protein interaction is important for the expansion and function of prostate tumors as well as luminal and basal breast tumor initiating cells. Their work provides novel peptides that target this protein complex to help control tumor initiation, recurrence and metastasis by combating tumor initiating cells, with minimal impact on normal tissues.
P140424US02

Monomeric Fluorescent Protein-Ligand Complexes with Strong Fluorescence in the Far-Red Region

Research from the University of Wisconsin-Washington County in collaboration with the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine in India, has resulted in the development of monomeric variants of the naturally occurring Sandercyanin Fluorescent Protein (SFP) using site-directed mutagenesis. This work has stemmed from earlier research focused on development of the tetrameric form of SFP, a biliverdin-binding lipocalin protein originally isolated from the mucus of the blue walleye fish, Sander vitreus. Monomeric variants of SFP (mSFPs) have been found to possess the same non-covalent, bili-binding characteristics of the tetramer but are one-quarter the size (~18.6kDa) and do not oligomerize. They are therefore anticipated to be more useful in a host of biotechnology applications. Like the tetrameric form, the mSFPs have a large stokes shift (375nm/675nm) and fluoresce in the far-red or near infrared region, which is advantageous for a wide range of applications including investigation of protein-protein interactions, spatial and temporal gene expression, assessing cell biology distribution and mobility, studying protein activity and protein interactions in vivo, as well as cancer research, immunology, and stem cell research and sub-cellular localization. In addition, the newly developed mSFP’s far-red fluorescence is particularly advantageous for in vivo, deep-tissue imaging.
T150029WO01

Retinoic Acid: A New Treatment for Sleep Apnea and Hypopnea

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new method for treating sleep apnea and hypopnea with retinoic acid.

A patient can be given a retinoid or retinoic acid receptor agonist such as all-trans RA (ATRA), 13-cis RA (isotretinoin) or 9-cis RA (alitretinoin). These compounds target the mechanisms that cause sleep apnea in two ways. First, they increase the respiratory drive (urge to breathe). Additionally, they reduce the apneic threshold (the level of CO2 necessary for the induction of breath) to normal levels.
P150330US02

Improved System for Stroke Therapy and Rehabilitation

UW-Madison researchers have developed an improved system for stroke therapy and rehabilitation.  This system collects movement intention signals from the brain in real-time via EEG and initiates functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the appropriate muscle(s) to assist the neurons in regrowing their connections from the brain to the muscles along the correct pathways.  Additional general sensory stimulation may be added to this therapy to further encourage proper neuron regrowth. 
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New Patents

Multiphoton Flow Cytometer for High Throughput Analysis of Multicellular Aggregates Like Pancreatic Islets

UW-Madison researchers have developed a system that combines the high throughput characteristics of flow cytometry with the capabilities of MPLSM.  This multiphoton flow cytometry system (MPFC) enables deep, high resolution images of large diameter cells and aggregates. 

The multiphoton laser can excite intrinsic cellular fluorophores such as NADH, FAD and collagen, allowing both spectral and lifetime data to be acquired.  This information then can be used to reveal information on cellular processes like metabolism, viability and the functional potential of cells, pancreatic islets, embryoid bodies and other entities.
P07386US

Portable Carbon Monoxide Source for Therapy and Organ Delivery

UW–Madison researchers have developed a portable carbon monoxide generator for medical use that creates precise, therapeutically relevant, concentrations of medical grade CO out of the surrounding air in real time. The device is inherently safe, as it produces only the amount of CO needed for therapy. The device is incapable of producing enough CO to pose a safety hazard.

The heart of the generator is a reaction chamber holding a small cartridge of purified carbon. The CO is produced by heating the carbon in the presence of air that is fed continuously into the reaction chamber. The carbon can be heated by any controllable energy source, such as an electrical filament or laser.

The amount of CO in the output stream is monitored by a sensor. Using feedback on both the gas flow rate and the heat source, the amount of CO generated is controlled to match the prescribed, adjustable value.
P120148US01

Maximizing Multicore Processor Performance

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a solution for improving performance while still meeting a maximum power budget for multicore processors operating in a power-constrained environment.

The method provides for joint scaling of both the number of cores in operation as well as the amount of resources per core. Selecting the number of cores and the amount of resources is done by examining the degree of ILP and TLP available for a given application. As such, performance counters (and other characteristics) implemented by a processor are used to determine optimal core/resource configurations.

Performance counters may measure, for example, how many instructions are executed per cycle, length of execution time and cache hit rate. These performance measurements indicate how much ILP and TLP a given application exhibits at a time.
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