Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,700 technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

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New Inventions

Physics ‘Office Hours’ educational learning platform

A physics education researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay has designed a novel and interactive app-based study aid platform for students in STEM disciplines. The platform’s interface is built around education research into how students conceptualize problems they do not understand. It is a novel tool to help students see why they are struggling with a particular problem, and what might help them solve it, rather than solving the problem for them. The team’s first working prototype, the Physics Office Hours app, has been designed for use in introductory-level college physics. The app is designed to mimic a scenario students might face during ‘office hours’ with a professor: Rather than offering an answer, the instructor guides the students through problems via a series of questions. A user-friendly online interface allows app content to be easily updated and changed over time and as more problem sets become available. In addition, the app architecture can easily be adapted to problem sets in other STEM disciplines and therefore serves as a platform technology.
T150035US01

Efficient In Vitro Assay for Antigen-Specific Tolerance

Building on their work, UW–Madison researchers have now developed a T cell-bound cytokine (T-CBC) assay for detecting and quantifying regulatory T cells specific to self-antigens or donor alloantigens. The new method comprises (a) culturing the subject’s T cells for 24 hours in the presence of one or more target antigens and (b) analyzing the cultured T cells for expression of a marker (EBi3; TGFβ/LAP) indicative of antigen-specific immune suppression.
P160186US02

Rhinovirus-C Peptide for Development of Vaccines and Antivirals

UW–Madison researchers have identified novel immunogenic peptides from RV-C that are useful targets for therapeutic antibodies.

Recent advances in microscopy enabled the researchers to determine (with atomic resolution) the structure of an RV-C strain, both in its full, infectious form and as native empty particles. The structures highlighted immunogenic surfaces that could be used to design antivirals or vaccines against RV-C.
P160341US02

New and More Potent UGM Inhibitors for Treating Tuberculosis, Other Microbial Infections

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new set of UGM inhibitors to fight tuberculosis and other diseases caused by microbial infections. The compounds feature an N-acylsulfonamide motif and are more potent in vitro than inhibitors previously identified by the researchers.
P160093US02

Compound Combination Targets Bacterial Virulence

The researchers have discovered that two lead compounds (E22/M64) can be combined to target multiple QS pathways at the same time (Rhl/Pqs), resulting in enhanced activity against P. aeruginosa and potentially other pathogens. This new cocktail approach is superior because it attenuates virulence factor production across a range of relevant environments where single compounds fail.
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New Patents

Zinc Oxide Thin Films Have Higher Electron Mobility

UW–Madison researchers have developed a room-temperature, solution-based surface treatment that improves the properties of zinc oxide film. The treatment uses molecules that bind to the film’s surface to increase electron mobility and conductivity.

In the process, a nanometer-thick film of polycrystalline zinc oxide or an alloy is disposed over a supporting substrate and a layer of organic carboxylic acid-containing molecules. The molecules can be derivatives of saturated fatty acids or photosensitizing dye. They bind to the surface of the film via their linkage groups.

The process is compatible with techniques for manufacturing large area electronics on flexible substrates.
P130004US02

Non-Natural Peptides for Treating Diabetes

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new approach for designing GLP-1 receptor agonists that could be used to treat diabetes. The agonists retain GLP-1-like function but have prolonged activity in vivo.

The method includes strategically replacing native α-amino acid residues with conformationally constrained β-amino acid resides. The new α/β peptides mimic GLP-1 in terms of interacting with pancreatic beta cells and regulating blood glucose levels. The peptides are less susceptible to enzyme degradation due in part to the multiple β residue replacements.
P130310US02

Visible-Range Sunlight Drives CO2 Reduction Process for Cheaper Syngas

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new method of reducing CO2 to CO via a reverse water gas shift reaction using visible solar light. The reaction produces a syngas mixture which can be further converted to liquid fuels.

In this process, CO2 (which can be obtained from many industrial processes) is contacted with a plasmonic catalyst in the presence of hydrogen. The catalyst is exposed to visible-range sunlight so that it undergoes an optical phenomenon called surface plasmon resonance, which causes metal electrons to oscillate in a certain way and accelerates the rate of CO2 reduction.

The process results in CO2 being reduced to water and CO that can be collected for downstream products.
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