Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,600 patented technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

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New Inventions

New System for Producing Fungal Secondary Metabolites

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new system for producing fungal secondary metabolites using test plasmids and a genetically modified strain of Aspergillus nidulans (TPMW2.3). The strain begins producing secondary metabolites when a gene promoter in the plasmid is triggered by culture conditions. This allows researchers to induce or repress production.
P150029US02

Poly(UG) Polymerase: A Useful New RNA Tool

UW–Madison researchers have identified a poly(UG) polymerase in a roundworm called Caenorhabditis elegans. The newly discovered enzyme adds repeating UG sequences to the ends of RNA. This activity could be useful as a research tool in vitro, e.g., providing a new way to synthesize cDNA of RNAs of unknown sequence.

The gene in C. elegans that encodes the enzyme is called RDE-3. Although its sequence was already known, its polymerase activity was not.
P140268US02

Treating Hemophilia B with Modified Protein

A UW–Madison researcher has developed new Factor IX mutants for treating blood coagulation conditions, including hemophilia B, hemorrhagic disorder and thrombosis. The modified proteins contain combined mutations in the heparin and antithrombin binding sites that prolong half-life and stability.

The new mutants show improved in vivo activity and more sustained therapeutic effect than naturally occurring Factor IX. They could potentially be administered intravenously, orally or by another route.
P150063US02

Peptides to Treat Alzheimer’s Disease

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new strategy to design peptides that could be turned into therapeutics to treat or halt the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. The cyclized (ring-shaped) peptides are derived from transthyretin (TTR), a protein found in cerebrospinal fluid that is known to bind to Aβ and inhibit its toxicity in vitro and in vivo. The new peptides mimic both the sequence and the hairpin structure of transthyretin’s Aβ binding domain.
P140391US02

Treating Iron Overload with Block Copolymers

UW–Madison researchers have developed new block copolymers for forming micelles that can respond to the oxidation state of their environment and chelate iron (II) and (III) ions. At suitable concentrations the copolymers can form micelles to prolong circulation in the blood and bind to non-transferrin bound iron. The micelles then break up in cells in the presence of oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide and are cleared from the body by the liver or kidney route.

The copolymers include a polyhydroxamic acid-containing block and a polyferrocenyl block. They can be prepared by standard peptide synthesis or polymerization methods.
P140395US02
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New Patents

Environmentally Green Glue

UW–Madison researchers have developed a process to transform soy flour into a strong, environmentally safe wood adhesive.

In the process, a suitable reagent is used to phosphorylate the flour’s lysine amino acid residues. The phosphorylated flour then is mixed with an oxidizing agent that drives the formation of cross-linking bonds. This improves the flour’s adhesive properties. Unwanted salts created in the process can be removed.

Flours of other legumes and/or oil seed crops (e.g., flax, canola) are suitable as well.
P130276US02

Treating Fungal Infections with New Forazoline Compounds

UW–Madison researchers have developed antifungal compounds isolated from Actinomadura, a bacterium found in a species of sea squirt. After extensive chemical isolation and characterization, the researchers identified a new class of compounds called ‘Forazolines’ that possess antifungal activity. Forazoline A was shown to be effective against Candida albicans in a mouse model.
P130274US02

Protecting Ovaries from Chemotherapy Damage Using Proteasome Inhibitors

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method to reduce ovarian damage in cancer patients by administering a proteasome inhibitor prior to chemotherapy.

The inhibitors work by binding to a cell’s proteasome –the large complex of enzymes found in the cytoplasm that degrades and disposes old proteins. This binding action blocks chemotherapeutic agents from invading the cell nucleus.

To shield ovaries from chemotherapy toxicity, an effective dose of a proteasome inhibitor like bortezomib (Bort) or MG-132 is injected about an hour before treatment.
P130111US02
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