Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,600 patented technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

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New Inventions

New System for Producing Fungal Secondary Metabolites

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new system for producing fungal secondary metabolites using test plasmids and a genetically modified strain of Aspergillus nidulans (TPMW2.3). The strain begins producing secondary metabolites when a gene promoter in the plasmid is triggered by culture conditions. This allows researchers to induce or repress production.
P150029US02

Treating Hemophilia B with Modified Protein

A UW–Madison researcher has developed new Factor IX mutants for treating blood coagulation conditions, including hemophilia B, hemorrhagic disorder and thrombosis. The modified proteins contain combined mutations in the heparin and antithrombin binding sites that prolong half-life and stability.

The new mutants show improved in vivo activity and more sustained therapeutic effect than naturally occurring Factor IX. They could potentially be administered intravenously, orally or by another route.
P150063US02

Treating Iron Overload with Block Copolymers

UW–Madison researchers have developed new block copolymers for forming micelles that can respond to the oxidation state of their environment and chelate iron (II) and (III) ions. At suitable concentrations the copolymers can form micelles to prolong circulation in the blood and bind to non-transferrin bound iron. The micelles then break up in cells in the presence of oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide and are cleared from the body by the liver or kidney route.

The copolymers include a polyhydroxamic acid-containing block and a polyferrocenyl block. They can be prepared by standard peptide synthesis or polymerization methods.
P140395US02

Modified Yeast with Enhanced Tolerance for GVL Biomass Solvent

UW–Madison researchers have developed a genetically modified strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is more resistant to GVL toxicity and grows more than 1.5 times faster than wild yeast in the presence of GVL.

The researchers deleted two genes (Pad1p and Fdc1p) in the yeast that play a role in mediating GVL tolerance. The new strain is the first ethanol-producing yeast specifically tailored for GVL-based techniques.
P140430US02

Temperature Gradient Handling System for Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) Measurements

Researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse have developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based method for measuring, in a single experiment, the temperature dependence of binding kinetics for biomolecular interactions. The method is based on a novel sample handling system that generates a spatial temperature gradient across an SPR sensor and is label free.
T150042US01
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New Patents

Short-Pulsed Alkali Magnetometer for Precision in Ambient Fields

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method of spin polarization using an AC-coupled short pulse, permitting ultrasensitive magnetometry in the presence of Earth-level magnetic fields. By suppressing the spin-relaxation due to interactions between the instrument’s alkali atoms, the short pulses attain high transverse spin polarization free of dephasing collisions.

With increased sensitivity, the new design permits detection of minute fluctuations on par with other alkali-based magnetometers that require a near zero magnetic field environment.

The magnetometer includes a gas chamber exposable to an external magnetic field. An electromagnet is positioned to apply a local magnetic field to the chamber. By modulating the rotational change of the alkali atoms with a controllable time-dependent magnetic field, the atoms can be retained in a state in which collisions do not dephase their magnetic orientation.
P110354US01

Producing Medical Isotopes with Dry-Phase Reactor

UW–Madison researchers have developed an improved method for generating medical isotopes using a dry-phase granular uranium compound, such as uranium salt or oxide.

In the process, the dry granular uranium is exposed to radiation that produces medical isotopes by nuclear reaction. The irradiated uranium then is dissolved in a solvent and the desired isotopes are extracted using standard aqueous separation techniques. The granular uranium material can be dried and reused.
P120306US01

High-Resolution R2 Mapping with Chemical Species Separation

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method for producing a quantitative map of R2* while separating signal contributions from two or more chemical species, like fat and water.

The method works by producing quantitative R2* maps, quantitative fat fraction maps and separate R2*-corrected water and fat images. A low-resolution field map and a common water-fat phase are used to demodulate the effects of these parameters from the acquired data while separating the water and fat signals.

In this way, water, fat and R2* can be estimated simultaneously. A full resolution R2* map is reconstructed in addition to water, fat and fat fraction images that are corrected for the effects of R2*.
P120316US01
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