Through Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,600 patented technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

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New Inventions

Treating Hemophilia B with Modified Protein

A UW–Madison researcher has developed new Factor IX mutants for treating blood coagulation conditions, including hemophilia B, hemorrhagic disorder and thrombosis. The modified proteins contain combined mutations in the heparin and antithrombin binding sites that prolong half-life and stability.

The new mutants show improved in vivo activity and more sustained therapeutic effect than naturally occurring Factor IX. They could potentially be administered intravenously, orally or by another route.
P150063US02

Treating Iron Overload with Block Copolymers

UW–Madison researchers have developed new block copolymers for forming micelles that can respond to the oxidation state of their environment and chelate iron (II) and (III) ions. At suitable concentrations the copolymers can form micelles to prolong circulation in the blood and bind to non-transferrin bound iron. The micelles then break up in cells in the presence of oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide and are cleared from the body by the liver or kidney route.

The copolymers include a polyhydroxamic acid-containing block and a polyferrocenyl block. They can be prepared by standard peptide synthesis or polymerization methods.
P140395US02

Modified Yeast with Enhanced Tolerance for GVL Biomass Solvent

UW–Madison researchers have developed a genetically modified strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is more resistant to GVL toxicity and grows more than 1.5 times faster than wild yeast in the presence of GVL.

The researchers deleted two genes (Pad1p and Fdc1p) in the yeast that play a role in mediating GVL tolerance. The new strain is the first ethanol-producing yeast specifically tailored for GVL-based techniques.
P140430US02

Combined Capacitor/Inductor with Improved Performance

UW–Madison researchers have now mitigated the problem of parasitic inductance. Their new design features a loop-back terminal structure that minimizes the net magnetic field induced by the capacitor current. In other words, the capacitor leads are routed back up through the middle of the core to cancel the increased inductance seen at the capacitor terminals.
P150389US01

Sustainable Process to Remediate Liquid Waste Streams

UW–Madison researchers have developed an environmentally sound and cost-effective system to remediate effluent streams containing organometallic/inorganometallic contaminants. Metals are recovered in the process and the treated water can be recycled for industrial applications.

The system includes units for electro-oxidation, electro-deposition and electro-adsorption. These units work sequentially to (1) break the strong chemical bonds in the waste stream, (2) recover the heavy metal ions and (3) remediate the organic/inorganic material.

A primary advantage of the new system is the redesigned electro-deposition unit, which houses a concentrating cathode and helps in the recovery of metals present even in very low concentrations in a reusable form.
P140335US02
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New Patents

Multidimensional Imaging with Improved Contrast

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new coherent multidimensional spectroscopy (CMDS) technique that enhances the image contrast by using multiple frequencies that provide 3-D contrast. The method uses three coherent light pulses (intense light beams) with three different frequencies to interact with multiple functionalities within the molecules (e.g., C-H bonds) to create coherent images that are highly characteristic of specific molecules within sample substructures.
P140021US02

SuperTag Cache for Energy-Optimized Compression

UW–Madison researchers have developed a compressed cache, called SuperTag, which exploits spatial locality to optimize compression effectiveness and energy use.

SuperTag cache manages cache at three granularities: ‘super blocks,’ single blocks and fractional data segments. Since contiguous blocks have the same tag address, SuperTag increases per-block tag space by tracking super blocks (for example, a group of four aligned contiguous blocks of 64 bytes each). It also breaks each cache block into smaller data segments for storage.

To improve compression ratio, the technique uses a variable-packing scheme allowing variable-size compression blocks without costly compaction. It also co-compresses contiguous blocks, including within the same super block, thereby producing data segments for storage.
P130076US01

Dynamic Predictor Improves Machine Control

The researcher now has developed a new dynamic predictor that rapidly and accurately calculates the motion trajectory of a system that is only partially constrained by joint inputs. This dynamic predictor achieves stable and accurate results for stiff systems. To do this, the predictor applies conditions achieving such results at both a first and second joint position at the start and end of a motion time step.

More specifically, the relationship between joints is described as a differential equation to be solved by the predictor. The predictor parameterizes the motion of the unconstrained joints in such a way as to match the conditions the solution needs to satisfy at both the start and end of a motion time step. As this parameterization is expressed by polynomial coefficients, motions of the remaining joints are readily determined by the kinematic predictor.
P130307US01
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