Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,700 technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

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New Inventions

Monomeric Fluorescent Protein-Ligand Complexes with Strong Fluorescence in the Far-Red Region

Research from the University of Wisconsin-Washington County in collaboration with the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine in India, has resulted in the development of monomeric variants of the naturally occurring Sandercyanin Fluorescent Protein (SFP) using site-directed mutagenesis. This work has stemmed from earlier research focused on development of the tetrameric form of SFP, a biliverdin-binding lipocalin protein originally isolated from the mucus of the blue walleye fish, Sander vitreus. Monomeric variants of SFP (mSFPs) have been found to possess the same non-covalent, bili-binding characteristics of the tetramer but are one-quarter the size (~18.6kDa) and do not oligomerize. They are therefore anticipated to be more useful in a host of biotechnology applications. Like the tetrameric form, the mSFPs have a large stokes shift (375nm/675nm) and fluoresce in the far-red or near infrared region, which is advantageous for a wide range of applications including investigation of protein-protein interactions, spatial and temporal gene expression, assessing cell biology distribution and mobility, studying protein activity and protein interactions in vivo, as well as cancer research, immunology, and stem cell research and sub-cellular localization. In addition, the newly developed mSFP’s far-red fluorescence is particularly advantageous for in vivo, deep-tissue imaging.
T150029WO01

Retinoic Acid: A New Treatment for Sleep Apnea and Hypopnea

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new method for treating sleep apnea and hypopnea with retinoic acid.

A patient can be given a retinoid or retinoic acid receptor agonist such as all-trans RA (ATRA), 13-cis RA (isotretinoin) or 9-cis RA (alitretinoin). These compounds target the mechanisms that cause sleep apnea in two ways. First, they increase the respiratory drive (urge to breathe). Additionally, they reduce the apneic threshold (the level of CO2 necessary for the induction of breath) to normal levels.
P150330US02

Improved System for Stroke Therapy and Rehabilitation

UW-Madison researchers have developed an improved system for stroke therapy and rehabilitation.  This system collects movement intention signals from the brain in real-time via EEG and initiates functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the appropriate muscle(s) to assist the neurons in regrowing their connections from the brain to the muscles along the correct pathways.  Additional general sensory stimulation may be added to this therapy to further encourage proper neuron regrowth. 
P09245US02

Building Framing System with Innovative Snap-in Track for Residential and Commercial Construction

An inventor who is an alumnus of UW-Fond du Lac has developed a building framing system for fast and easy construction of interior non-load-bearing walls. The unique design of the system allows a series of studs to be temporarily secured without fasteners, until sheetrock or other face material can be applied. The system does not need to be secured against sidewalls, and can accommodate both wood and metal studs, which can easily be removed and adjusted as needed. The system is flexible and can secure studs that vary in length by up to ½”. This technology offers a user-friendly tool for experienced construction professionals or for home improvement projects such as do-it-yourself basement finishing.
T160038US01

Treatment of Fragile X Syndrome Using Nutlin-3

UW–Madison researchers have discovered that Nutlin-3, a candidate antitumor drug, and its derivatives may be useful for treating patients with FXS or other intellectual disability. This is the first time that Nutlin-3 has been shown to inhibit adult neural stem cell proliferation and rescue cognitive deficits in a FXS mouse model.

Nutlin-3 is a small molecule MDM2-p53 pathway inhibitor developed in 2004. The researchers use <10x dosage for FXS compared to the dosage used for cancer treatment.
P150380US02
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New Patents

Block Copolymers for Sub-10 Nanometer Lithography

UW–Madison researchers have developed BCPs characterized by high Flory-Huggins interaction parameters (χ). They can self-assemble into domains having very small dimensions, and therefore are extremely useful in lithography.

The new BCPS may be polymerized from PHS monomers or from tert-butyl styrene and 2-vinylpyridine monomers. Overall degree of polymerization (N) can be experimentally controlled so that it’s high enough to form a desired phase (e.g., cylinders, spheres, lamellae, etc.) but low enough to produce very small dimensions.
P140025US01

Motor for Electric Vehicles Solves Load/Loss Tradeoff

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new IPM design methodology that offers a solution to conventional performance tradeoffs.

The new design features variable flux linkage characteristics to reduce iron and copper loss under low and high load conditions, respectively. The design does not compromise torque capability and exploits flux leakage already present in every PM machine. In other words, compared to previous IPMs, this technology is able to convert a weakness into an advantage.

More specifically, the rotor geometry is designed such that flux leakage can be shifted to cross the air gap and become desirable flux linkage when stator current is applied. It can be increased or decreased as needed based on load conditions.
P120243US01

Understanding and Treating Nervous System Dysfunction Using Modified Fly Models

UW–Madison researchers have developed new methods to study such time-dependent neurological mechanisms and to screen for potentially therapeutic small molecules using extended third instar stage (ETI) Drosophila larvae. These flies have been genetically modified to remain in the larval period for up to 30 days but are otherwise normal. Given the longer time window, these ETI larvae can be utilized to identify agents that stimulate nerve regeneration, confer neuroprotection or prevent synaptic degeneration.

For such studies, the ETI larvae are fed test compounds (e.g., from a chemical library) and the functional consequences of the test agent on processes such as neuronal survival, axonal regrowth, and synaptic maintenance are assessed in appropriate assays.
P120334US02
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