Through Technologies

New Inventions

Predicting Male Fertility in Cattle

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a method for predicting whether a sperm sample will have high or low fertility based on average sperm head brightness. Generally, samples that exhibit brighter DNA staining have lower fertility.

In the process, a fresh or frozen sample is stained with DNA-binding fluorescent dye and imaged with a microscope. The brightness of the sperm head is averaged and compared with samples of known fertility.
(Jul 22, 2014) P130280US02

Thermogel for Combination Drug Delivery

UW–Madison researchers have developed hydrogels for delivering drug combinations to cancer patients. The gel is made of a solution of heat-sensitive, biodegradable block copolymers (PLGA-PEG-PLGA) that turn semisolid at body temperature.

The gel can contain a combination of therapeutic agents like rapamycin, paclitaxel and 17-AAG. After being administered to a patient, the gel releases the drugs at a controlled rate, and then biodegrades into nontoxic fragments.
(Jul 22, 2014) P130338US03

Treating and Preventing Restenosis with Leukemia Drug

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new approach to treat and prevent restenosis using a drug originally designed to fight leukemia. The researchers discovered that the generic drug idarubicin inhibited the proliferation of smooth muscle cells while having no negative impact on endothelial healing.

Drug-eluting stents and other medical devices containing idarubicin (or an analog) could be administered prior to or following a vascular procedure like angioplasty.
(Jul 2, 2014) P130091US02

Kit Predicts Twinning in Cattle

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a genetic test to determine the likelihood a cow or a bull’s female progeny will produce twin offspring. The test is based on the presence or absence of the ‘trio’ haplotype, which is a set of three genetic markers on bovine chromosome 10 (BTA10). In combination, these markers suggest a cow or bull has a higher propensity for twinning.
(Jul 1, 2014) P130303US02

Phosphine Ligands Made Cheaper, Better

UW–Madison researchers have developed methods for synthesizing novel classes of chiral phosphine ligands via enantioselective copper-catalyzed halogenation. The process is rapid and flexible, and also can be used to streamline the preparation of known phosphines.

The researchers previously described their ‘recycling’ method for use with aromatic compounds. Now, they have rendered the process enantioselective using an asymmetric bidentate phosphine ligand to produce scaffolds with high enantiomeric purity.

In essence, the use of the phosphine ligand helps form a chiral center in a complex product that is otherwise costly or impossible to create.
(Jun 16, 2014) P130268US02

More Accurate Branch Predictor Circuit

UW–Madison researchers have developed a more accurate branch prediction method by distinguishing between ‘biased’ and ‘non-biased’ branch instructions. Biased branches are consistently skewed towards one direction while non-biased branches resolve in both directions.

The new method filters out biased branches because they merely reinforce earlier prediction decisions. Favoring non-biased branches enables more far apart correlations and superior prediction accuracy.
(Jun 13, 2014) P140330US01

Generating Vasculogenic Cell Populations from Human Stem Cells

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method for generating substantially pure populations of vasculogenic cells (i.e., pericytes and smooth muscle cells) from induced pluripotent stem cells following their differentiation into mesenchymal colony-forming progenitors, called mesenchymoangioblasts (MABs).

The process includes culturing the progenitors in a serum-free medium under conditions that promote differentiation to MABs. Subsequently, the MABs are cultured in medium containing PDGFBB to obtain pericytes, or sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) to obtain smooth muscle cells.
(Jun 12, 2014) P130364US02

Treating Fungal Infections with New Forazoline Compounds

UW–Madison researchers have developed antifungal compounds isolated from Actinomadura, a bacterium found in a species of sea squirt. After extensive chemical isolation and characterization, the researchers identified a new class of compounds called ‘Forazolines’ that possess antifungal activity. Forazoline A was shown to be effective against Candida albicans in a mouse model.
(Jun 9, 2014) P130274US02

Preventing Skin Cancer Using Protein Inhibitor

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a method of preventing SCC, BCC and malignant melanoma skin cancers using Hsp90 inhibitors. Suitable inhibitors include 17-AAG (known as Tanespimycin) and NVP-BEP800.

The inhibitor binds to Hsp90 and alters its function, disrupting interaction between Hsp90 and PKCε (the protein linked to skin cancer). This causes reduced expression levels of PKCε.

The inhibitor(s) can be administered topically in the form of a lotion, spray, patch, etc. Such inhibitors also may be used to prevent skin damage like wrinkles, age spots, freckles and dryness.
(Jun 4, 2014) P130024US02