Technologies

Pharmaceuticals & Vitamin D : Oncology & hematology

Pharmaceuticals & Vitamin D Portfolios

Technologies

Analogs of Diptoindonesin G for Breast Cancer Drug Development

UW–Madison researchers have synthesized analogs of Dip G that have shown a greater ability than the parent molecule to decrease ERα expression and stabilize ERβ in cultured breast cancer cells. The compounds are active for ameliorating, attenuating and halting the growth/metastasis of breast cancers.
P170010US02

Inhibiting Metadherin/SND1 Interaction to Treat Cancer

UW–Madison researchers and collaborators have developed a method to fight tumor growth and metastasis using novel peptides that inhibit interaction between MTDH and a protein called SND1.

The researchers found that MTDH-SND1 protein interaction is important for the expansion and function of prostate tumors as well as luminal and basal breast tumor initiating cells. Their work provides novel peptides that target this protein complex to help control tumor initiation, recurrence and metastasis by combating tumor initiating cells, with minimal impact on normal tissues.
P140424US02

Treating Hemophilia B with Modified Protein

A UW–Madison researcher has developed new Factor IX mutants for treating blood coagulation conditions, including hemophilia B, hemorrhagic disorder and thrombosis. The modified proteins contain combined mutations in the heparin and antithrombin binding sites that prolong half-life and stability.

The new mutants show improved in vivo activity and more sustained therapeutic effect than naturally occurring Factor IX. They could potentially be administered intravenously, orally or by another route.
P150063US02

Treating Iron Overload with Block Copolymers

UW–Madison researchers have developed new block copolymers for forming micelles that can respond to the oxidation state of their environment and chelate iron (II) and (III) ions. At suitable concentrations the copolymers can form micelles to prolong circulation in the blood and bind to non-transferrin bound iron. The micelles then break up in cells in the presence of oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide and are cleared from the body by the liver or kidney route.

The copolymers include a polyhydroxamic acid-containing block and a polyferrocenyl block. They can be prepared by standard peptide synthesis or polymerization methods.
P140395US02

Combination Therapy Kills Cancer Cells

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new cancer treatment that combines a TRAIL receptor agonist with the diabetes drug metformin. Metformin sensitizes even resistant cancer cells to the TRAIL receptor agonists (e.g., lexatumumab) that induce cell death.

Metformin is attractive because its safety has been established over decades in diabetic patients worldwide. As such, there seem to be few barriers to its clinical implementation as a cancer therapeutic in combination with TRAIL receptor agonists. Metformin is commercially available as Glucophage® or in generic form.
P140221US02

Increasing Red Blood Cell Production

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method for increasing the production of red blood cells by knocking down certain components of the exosome (a protein complex inside cells that degrades RNA). Specifically, the new method uses an siRNA, ribozyme or other inhibitory nucleic acid molecule to decrease the expression of Exosc8, Exosc9, Dis3, Dis3L or Exosc10.

Knocking down these exosome components boosts genes and proteins that promote red blood cell development.
P130326US02

Protecting Ovaries from Chemotherapy Damage Using Proteasome Inhibitors

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method to reduce ovarian damage in cancer patients by administering a proteasome inhibitor prior to chemotherapy.

The inhibitors work by binding to a cell’s proteasome –the large complex of enzymes found in the cytoplasm that degrades and disposes old proteins. This binding action blocks chemotherapeutic agents from invading the cell nucleus.

To shield ovaries from chemotherapy toxicity, an effective dose of a proteasome inhibitor like bortezomib (Bort) or MG-132 is injected about an hour before treatment.
P130111US02

Synstatin “SSTNHER2” Fights Cancer

A UW–Madison researcher has discovered that the HER2/α6β4 assembly is brokered by the syndecan family of matrix receptors. In particular, syndecan-1 (Sdc1) links the two receptors together and helps tumor cells survive.

To obstruct this process, the researcher has created a recombinant peptide that competes with Sdc1 for binding partners. The new peptide mimics Sdc1 but is harmless. It is called SSTNHER2. It can be administered as a drug and combined with cancer patients’ other therapies.
P120259US03

Synstatin “SSTNEGFR” Fights Cancer

A UW–Madison researcher has discovered that the EGFR/α6β4 assembly is mediated by the syndecan family of matrix receptors. Specifically, syndecan-4 (Sdc4) links the two receptors together and helps tumor cells grow and survive.

To obstruct this process, the researcher has created a recombinant peptide that competes with Sdc4 for binding partners. The new peptide is derived from Sdc4 but is harmless. It is called SSTNEGFR. It can be administered as a drug and combined with cancer patients’ other therapies.
P120300US03

Provoking Anti-Tumor Immune Response with Rhamnose

UW–Madison researchers have developed L-rhamnose antigen-lipid conjugates for provoking anti-tumor immune responses in humans and other animals. The conjugates can be inserted into tumor cell membranes where they attract cancer-fighting cytotoxic T cells.

The conjugates contain at least two L-rhamnose moieties connected to a lipid (such as DPoPE) via a standard linker. They are structured to invade tumor cell membranes and display antigen on the cell surface. The new conjugates could be combined with other chemotherapeutic agents and administered as a pharmaceutical injection or ointment.
P120290US02

Vitamin D Analog “DA2HE” to Treat and Prevent Polyps, Hyperplastic Intestinal Disorders

UW–Madison researchers have developed a vitamin D analog, seco-A-2,19-dinor-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Known as DA2HE, the compound exhibits high activity in vivo, especially in intestinal tissues. Relatively low receptor binding, differentiation and transcription activities suggest strong cell selectivity for use against polyps, some cancers and intestinal disorders. The compound’s high intestinal calcium transport activity may be useful against bone diseases.
P120347US02

Use of Peptides of Syndecan-1 to Inhibit Angiogenesis

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method of using a novel peptide from the extracellular domain of syndecan-1 to inhibit angiogenesis. The peptide interferes with the formation of new blood vessels by blocking the activation of αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins. Recent in vivo mouse data shows that this peptide successfully inhibits angiogenesis and reduces tumor size without adverse side effects.
P06390US02

Vitamin D Analogs “2EG” and “T-2EG-S” for Treating Cancer and Bone Disease

UW–Madison researchers have developed vitamin D analogs (20S) and (20R)- 1a,25-dihydroxy-2-methylene-vitamin D3 and (5E)-(20S)-1a,25-dihysroxy-2-methylene-vitamin D3.These compounds exhibit high binding affinity and cell differentiation activity, suggesting anticancer properties. Also, high calcemic activity may be harnessed for the treatment of bone diseases where less frequent doses are desired.
P120086US02

Vitamin D Analogs “1D-QM” and “1D-QMS” for Cancer, Bone Disease Therapy

UW–Madison researchers have developed vitamin D analogs (20S) and (20R)-25-hydroxy-2-methylene-vitamin D3. In vivo, these compounds could act as prodrugs since 1-hydroxylation can occur in a regulated manner and extended vitamin release activity is predicted. The compounds exhibit high binding affinity and cell differentiation activity, suggesting anticancer properties. Also, high calcemic activity may be harnessed for bone disease treatments in which less frequent doses are preferred, like senile osteoporosis.
P120085US02

Vitamin D Analogs “3D-QM” and “3D-QMS” for Treating Cancer and Bone Diseases

UW–Madison researchers have developed vitamin D analogs (20S) and (20R)-3-desoxy-1a,25-dihydroxy-2-methylene vitamin D3.These compounds are known also as 3D-QMS and 3D-QM, respectively. They exhibit anticancer properties of high binding affinity and cell differentiation activity. High calcemic activity suggests treatment for bone ailments and diseases.
P120087US02

Vitamin D Analog “UW-05” for Skin Therapy, Parathyroid and Autoimmune Disease Treatment

UW–Madison researchers have developed a vitamin D analog, 2-methylene-(22E)-25-hexanoyl-24-oxo-26,27-cyclo-22-dehydro-19-nor-1α-hydroxyvitamin D3. Known as UW-05, the compound shows high transcription activity, pronounced activity in arresting proliferating cells and inducing their differentiation. Bone calcium mobilization activity is lower compared to the native hormone. UW-05 may be useful against autoimmune diseases, some cancers, skin wrinkles and disorders, inflammatory problems and obesity.
P08422US02

Vitamin D Analogs for Treating Bone Cancers and Diseases

UW–Madison researchers have developed vitamin D analogs,(20S)-3-desoxy-2-methylene-1a,25-diydroxy-19-nor-vitamin D3 and (20R)-3-desoxy-2-methylene-1a,25-diydroxy-19-nor-vitamin D3.These compounds exhibit promising anti-cancer activities: high receptor binding, and the arrest and induced-differentiation of proliferating cells. High calcemic mobilization suggests particular effectiveness in the treatment of bone diseases.
P100358US03

Vitamin D Analog “CPA-1” for Treating and Preventing Deadliest Cancers

UW–Madison researchers have developed a novel vitamin D analog, N-cycloporpyl-(20R)-2-methylene-19,26,27-trinor-25-aza-1a-hydroxyvitamin D3, also known as CPA-1. This compound binds to vitamin D receptors with high affinity, shows some cell-type selectivity, and is almost as potent as the native hormone in causing cellular differentiation. It also is less active than calcitriol in raising tissue calcium levels. It potentially may be developed into a useful anticancer agent.
P100357US02

Biocompatible Formulations of Poorly Soluble Anticancer Drugs Such as Gossypol

UW–Madison researchers have developed biocompatible micelles loaded with gossypol or combinations of gossypol and other anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, 17-AAG and cyclopamine. These drug formulations are stable and provide improved bioavailability without causing toxicity. They enable the intravenous delivery of cancer therapeutics like gossypol that are poorly soluble in water.
P100278US02

Vitamin D Analog “TS-17” for the Treatment of Cancer, Particularly Leukemia and Lung Cancer

UW–Madison researchers have developed a novel vitamin D analog, (20S)-25,26,27-trinor-24-(p-methylphenylsulfonate)-vitamin D3, also known as TS-17. This analog binds the vitamin D receptor with very low affinity and has very low ability to stimulate gene transcription. TS-17 has little calcemic activity and showed no calcium-related toxicity issues. It does not promote cellular differentiation, but has been shown to kill cancer cells in a leukemia cell line as well as in a small cell lung carcinoma cell line, making it potentially useful for the treatment of some types of cancer.
P110039US02

Vitamin D Analog “AB-47” for Cancer Prevention and Treatment

UW–Madison researchers have developed a novel vitamin D analog, 22-bromoacetoxy-homopregnacalciferol, also known as AB-47. This analog binds the vitamin D receptor with much lower affinity than the native hormone, has very low ability to stimulate gene transcription and has little calcemic activity. AB-47 does not promote cancer cell differentiation. Instead, it has been shown to kill cancer cells in a leukemia cell line as well as in small cell lung carcinoma, making it potentially useful for the treatment of some types of cancer.
P110091US02

Library of Glycosylated Chlorambucil Analogs for Cancer Treatment

UW–Madison researchers have used glycorandomization to develop a set of 63 glycosylated chlorambucil molecules. Several of these novel compounds are efficacious against various types of cancer cells. They could be developed into cancer therapeutics.
P110076US02

Novel Tautomycetin Analogs Specifically Inhibit SHP-2, May Provide New Cancer Treatment

Researchers at UW–Madison and Indiana University have developed novel TTN analogs that inhibit SHP-2. These analogs can be used to treat diseases related to SHP-2, including Noonan syndrome, Leopard syndrome, leukemia and solid tumors.  

The researchers showed that TTN and one of its engineered analogs, TTN D-1, specifically inhibit the activity of SHP-2. They also determined the X-ray crystal structure of SHP-2 with TTN D-1 bound to its active site. Together with the biochemical and cellular data, this structure supports the idea that SHP-2 is a cellular target for TTN and provides new insights for developing novel therapeutics that target SHP-2.
P100290US03

Novel Tautomycetin Analogs Provide Potential Natural Products for the Treatment of Cancer or Autoimmune Disease

A UW–Madison researcher has developed novel TTN analogs, which may be potentially useful for the treatment of cancer or autoimmune disorders. The researcher previously cloned and sequenced the biosynthetic gene cluster for TTN.  He discovered that inactivating two genes, ttnD and ttnF, abolishes production of TTN and leads to the production of five new TTN analogs. 

WARF reference number P100290US03 describes the use of the analogs to inhibit the oncogene SHP-2. In addition to autoimmune disorders, the analogs can be used to treat diseases related to SHP-2, including Noonan syndrome, Leopard syndrome, leukemia and solid tumors.
P100341US02

Warfarin Promoter

Researchers at UW-Eau Claire and Marshfield Clinic have developed a new class of compounds that enhance the anticoagulant activity of warfarin when co-administered. When the compound is paired with warfarin, they quadruple the anticoagulant activity when compared to warfarin alone. Additionally, preliminary animal tests show the compounds are not toxic when administered alone.
T100001US02

Vitamin D Analog for Cancer Prevention and Treatment

UW–Madison researchers have developed a novel vitamin D analog, (20S)-25-hydroxy-1-desoxy-2-methylene-19-nor-vitamin D3. This compound binds the vitamin D receptor and causes differentiation of cancer cells nearly as well as calcitriol but does not raise tissue calcium levels to the same degree, suggesting that it could be developed into a useful anticancer agent.
P100077US02

Vitamin D Analog “N-23” for Cancer Prevention and Treatment

UW–Madison researchers have developed a novel vitamin D analog, (20S,22E)-methylene-19-nor-22-ene-1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, also known as N-23. This compound binds the vitamin D receptor with the same affinity as the native hormone but is more potent in causing cellular differentiation and increasing expression of the 24-hydroxylase gene. It also is less active than calcitriol in causing intestinal calcium transport. It potentially may be developed into a useful anticancer agent.
P100068US02

Vitamin D Analogs “DO-REVA” and “DO-REVB” for Cancer Prevention and Treatment

UW–Madison researchers have developed two novel vitamin D analogs, 1,2-cyclopentene-25-hydroxy-19-nor-vitamin D3, known as DO-REVA, and 3,2-cyclopentene-1α-25-dihydroxy-19-nor-vitamin D3, known as DO-REVB. Both analogs bind the vitamin D receptor with lower affinity than the native hormone. One of the analogs, DO-REVA, has measurable transcription activity at higher concentrations, suggesting that it may serve as a slow-release anticancer drug or be used as a local-acting drug when coupled with an appropriate delivery method. The other analog, DO-REVB, promotes cancer cell differentiation, making it potentially useful for the treatment of cancer. Like DO-REVA, DO-REVB also may serve as a slow-release or local-acting drug.
P100083US02

Vitamin D Analog “Me-Cvit” Potentially Useful to Inhibit Hypercalcemia, Treat Cancer

UW–Madison researchers have developed a novel vitamin D analog, 1α,25-dihydroxy-6-methylvitamin D3, also known as Me-Cvit. This compound binds the vitamin D receptor with the same affinity as the native hormone but shows much less potency for other biological activities, including promotion of calcium transport. It could act as a dominant negative and be useful as an antidote for vitamin D intoxication to help treat hypercalcemia caused by a vitamin D analog. In addition, because Me-Cvit shows some cellular differentiation activity and ability to promote transcription of 24-hydroxylase but does not promote intestinal calcium transport, it may be useful as an anticancer agent, particularly for leukemia, colon cancer, breast cancer, skin cancer or prostate cancer.
P100082US02

Using Anti-Estrogens to Treat Cervical or Vaginal Cancer and Dysplasia

UW-Madison researchers have developed a method for treating cervical or vaginal cancer that greatly decreases cancerous and precancerous lesions in the cervix and vagina. The method involves administering an anti-estrogen, such as fulvestrant or raloxifene, to women who have been diagnosed with the disease. An anti-estrogen also could be administered to women at risk for cervical or vaginal cancer to prevent cancer development or recurrence.
P09292US03

Sigma 1 Receptor Inhibitors May Provide New Cancer, Psychosis, Addiction and Other Therapies

UW-Madison researchers have discovered a new class of compounds that are high affinity inhibitors of the sigma 1 receptor. These compounds are cytotoxic against many cancer cell lines, including breast, lung, prostate, ovarian, colorectal and CNS. They could be used as antipsychotic agents, to treat cocaine addiction or cardiovascular disorders or to inhibit the growth of cancer cells.

The inventors characterized the sigma 1 receptor ligand binding regions to define novel and essential features of the molecular scaffold of high affinity ligands. They found that long chain alkylamines are a key feature of ligands, such as the fungicide tridemorph, that bind to the sigma 1 receptor with high affinity and inhibit its activity.
P09097US02

Glycosylated Warfarin Analogs for the Treatment of Cancer

UW-Madison researchers now have used a three step glycorandomization procedure to generate a library of warfarin derivatives that may be useful in the treatment of cancer. They identified a set of glycosylated warfarin analogs that show anticancer activity. Because warfarin is intrinsically fluorescent, these analogs also may be useful as research tools for studying sugar uptake in cells.
P08342US02

Prostate Cancer and Melanoma Screening

UW-Madison researchers have developed a minimally invasive method of screening for prostate cancer or melanoma. They identified a number of antigens to which patients with prostate cancer or melanoma have developed antibody immune responses. The antigens may provide clinicians with new tools for the diagnosis and monitoring of prostate cancer or melanoma. A blood sample from a patient can be tested against a panel of the prostate cancer or melanoma antigens. An immune reaction to any member of the panel might indicate the patient needs further examination.

The researchers also developed a method for determining if an anti-cancer immune therapy is effective. Anti-tumor vaccines stimulate the immune system to form antibodies against tumor cells, delaying the onset or progression of cancer. The panel of antigens can be used to determine if an immune therapy, either antigen-specific or non-antigen-specific, has elicited responses to other antigens and might therefore be an effective therapy. In addition, the antigens themselves may serve as targets for antigen-specific immune therapies.
P06004US

Methods and Compositions for Treating Prostate Cancer Using DNA Vaccines

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new approach for inducing an immune response to a protein critical in the progression of prostate cancer. Their approach utilizes a DNA vaccine directed against the androgen receptor (AR). The invention describes the generation and administration of a DNA plasmid containing all or select portions of the AR gene in order to elicit an immune response in a mammal, including in a human.
P05235US

Modulating Notch1 Signaling Pathway for Treating Neuroendocrine Tumors

UW-Madison researchers have developed a method of activating the Notch1 signaling pathway to treat neuroendocrine tumors, as well as the effects of increased hormonal secretion associated with these tumors. The transcription factor hASH1, which is involved in the Notch1 signaling pathway, is found at high levels in certain neuroendocrine tumors. Notch1 activation leads to the induction of HES-1, which in turn leads to the suppression of hASH1 in tumor cells. The researchers found that increasing the expression of the Notch1 gene, by contacting a cancer cell with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, resulted in a decrease in the production of serotonin, a hormone often overproduced in neuroendocrine tumors, as well as a decrease in tumor cell growth.
P06043US

Modulating Cell Death and Proliferation

UW-Madison researchers have developed materials and methods for inducing cell death in targeted mammalian cells by modulating levels of OAADPr. A cell is contacted with an agent, such as puromycin, which inhibits the breakdown of OAADPr and results in increased cellular levels of OAADPr. Alternatively, additional OAADPr can be delivered to the cell. The increased concentration of OAADPr causes the TRPM2 ion channel to remain constitutively open, disrupting calcium homeostasis. Depending on the cell type and concentration of OAADPr, this inhibits proliferation or causes the affected cell to die. 
 
P05087US

TTNPB Analogs Useful for Preventing or Treating Cancer

UW-Madison researchers have developed less toxic TTNPB analogs for the prevention or treatment of breast cancer. One such analog, 4-HBTTNPB, inhibits the proliferation of tumor cells. Because it binds poorly to the retinoic acid receptor and the retinoic X receptor, it is less likely to cause adverse side effects than TTNPB.
P05114US

Cytotoxic Ribonuclease Variants

UW-Madison researchers have developed new, highly cytotoxic variants of human ribonuclease (RNase 1). They determined—for the first time—the three dimensional atomic crystal structure of human RI (hRI) bound to RNase 1 and then used this structure to modify the amino acid sequence of RNase 1 so it could not be easily bound by hRI. The modified ribonucleases retain their catalytic properties and are more cytotoxic than previously engineered ribonucleases.
P05341US

Cytotoxic Ribonuclease Variants

UW-Madison researchers have developed new, highly cytotoxic variants of the bovine ribonuclease A (RNase A) superfamily of ribonucleases. They used the Fast Atomic Density Evaluation (FADE) algorithm for molecular interaction analysis to model the locations where RNase A and RI are in molecular contact. The amino acid sequence of RNase A was then modified at these locations so it could not be easily bound by RI. The modified ribonucleases retain their catalytic properties and are more cytotoxic than previously engineered ribonucleases.
P04427US

Analogs of Retinamide and Method of Using the Same to Inhibit Neoplastic Cell Growth

UW-Madison researchers have developed compounds that exhibit the anti-tumor activity of HPRCG but cannot be hydrolyzed to yield retinoic acid in vivo. In these analogs, the amide bond of HPRCG is replaced with a methylene group to yield 4-HBRCG, the fully C-linked derivative of N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide-O-glucuronide.

Tumor growth inhibition assays using an accepted in vivo rat model of breast cancer have demonstrated that these compounds are useful to prevent and treat cancer in mammals. In addition, toxic side effects seen during treatment with other retinoids were reduced or eliminated in animals given 4-HBRCG.
P03312US

Chroman-Derived Anti-Androgens for Treatment of Androgen-Mediated Disorders

UW-Madison researchers have developed improved anti-androgen compounds for preventing and treating androgen-mediated disorders, such as prostate cancer. The inventors discovered that the chromanol-derived moiety of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) exhibits anti-androgen properties and blocks androgen-associated effects in prostate cells.

Because these compounds are water soluble, they do not readily cross the blood-brain barrier and do not significantly affect the androgen receptors in brain tissues. Instead, these compounds block the androgen receptors only in peripheral tissues, resulting in treatment of androgen-mediated disorders with few side effects.
P03163US

Methods and Compositions for Treating Prostate Cancer with DNA Vaccines

A UW-Madison researcher has developed a DNA vaccine for treating prostate cancer. The vaccine consists of a plasmid vector that contains a DNA sequence encoding the enzyme prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and a transcription regulatory element. PAP is expressed almost exclusively in prostate tissue. Serum levels of PAP are low in healthy individuals, but elevated in individuals with prostate cancer. When the vaccine is administered to a patient, it induces a cytotoxic immune reaction against cells expressing PAP. This leads to destructive prostatitis (inflammation of the prostate gland), killing the prostate cells.
P02376US

Preparations and Uses of an Endogenous Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

UW-Madison researchers have identified a novel endogenous AhR ligand, 2-(1`H-indole-3`-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester. This AhR ligand likely regulates cell growth and differentiation in a highly tissue-specific manner, and may also exhibit responses similar to those caused by some of the known AhR ligands. Determining the normal physiological function(s) of this ligand should provide important new information on the mechanism of AhR-mediated biological responses. In addition, this endogenous AhR ligand and its various analogs should be useful for a wide variety of therapeutic applications.
P01315US

Monoterpenes and Sesquiterpenes as Chemotherapeutic and Radiation Sensitizers and Immunomodulators

UW-Madison researchers have developed a method of sensitizing tumor cells to radiation therapy, chemotherapy and immunomodulatory therapy. Tumor cells are first exposed to an effective amount of at least one monoterpene or sesquiterpene and are then exposed to radiation, chemotherapeutic agents or immunomodulatory agents.

The inventors have shown that treating cancer cells with monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, such as POH, restores the Fas pathway in those cells. As a result, cancer cells are more susceptible to Fas-mediated apoptosis by chemotherapeutic drugs, radiation or immunomodulatory agents.
P01132US

C-linked Analogs of N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) Retinamide

Researchers have now prepared a fully C-linked analog, 4-hydroxybenzylretinone (4-HBR), which exhibits marked anti-neoplastic activity in culture and in vivo. All 4-HPR-sensitive tumor cell lines examined to date are also growth inhibited by 4-HBR, including mammary, prostate, neuroblastoma, leukemia lines. Cultured mammary cancer cells exhibit profound apoptosis when exposed to 4-HBR. 4-HBR has also been shown to regress pre-formed mammary tumors in the rat, and chemoprevention trials are planned.
P99254US

The C-myc Coding Region Determinant Binding Protein (CRD-BP) and Its Nucleic Acid Sequence

A UW-Madison researcher has identified a coding region determinant binding protein (CRD-BP) that stabilizes c-myc mRNA by binding to the coding region determinant (CRD) on c-myc, thereby increasing the abundance of c-myc protein. Several properties of the CRD-BP link it to human cancer, including a recent study where 15 out of 21 colon cancer specimens were positive for CRD-BP expression. The cancer-related protein can be detected by examining patient tissue and comparing the expression level with control levels.
P98088US

Novel Analogs of Podophyllotoxin May Treat Cancer and Viral Infections

UW–Madison researchers have now synthesized a library of podophyllotoxin derivatives using the neoglycorandomization method. The new derivatives may be useful for treating cancer or as antivirals.
P08343US