Technologies

Research Tools : Novel microbes

Technologies

New System for Producing Fungal Secondary Metabolites

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new system for producing fungal secondary metabolites using test plasmids and a genetically modified strain of Aspergillus nidulans (TPMW2.3). The strain begins producing secondary metabolites when a gene promoter in the plasmid is triggered by culture conditions. This allows researchers to induce or repress production.
P150029US02

Modified E. coli for Enhanced Production of Pyruvate, Ethanol

UW–Madison researchers have developed a variety of new E. coli strains capable of producing pyruvate up to 95 percent of the maximum theoretical yield from renewable sources under aerobic conditions. This exceeds the highest previously reported yields of 78 percent.

The researchers used a genome-scale metabolic model of E. coli to identify multiple gene deletion targets that couple growth rate with pyruvate production. Further engineering of these new strains enabled them to produce ethanol at near maximum theoretical yields.
P140301US02

Bio-Based Production of Non-Straight-Chain and Oxygenated Fatty Acids for Fuels and More

UW–Madison researchers have identified several enzymes in the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides that can be purified to produce non-straight-chain fatty acids in vitro or expressed in genetically modified microorganisms including E. coli for synthesis in vivo. Strains may be ‘fine-tuned’ to produce a specific type of non-straight-chain fatty acid (e.g., furan-containing) by expressing, overexpressing or deleting the enzymes in various combinations.
P140318US02

Enhanced Biomass Digestion with Wood Wasp Bacteria

UW–Madison researchers have derived preparations from ActE secretions that highly degrade lignocellulose. The bacteria can be obtained from Sirex noctilio wasps and grown on a substrate containing mostly cellulose, hemicelluloses, xylan, wood or non-wood biomass, and chitin. The substrate may be pretreated for better results. The ActE are grown aerobically to maximize the secretion of both oxidative and hydrolytic enzymes capable of rapid deconstruction of matter. The secretions can be purified and added directly to biomass slurry.
P110314US03

Bacterial Culture Collection from an Extreme Environment in Alaska

A team of UW-Madison researchers has now created a culture collection of over 1,000 bacterial isolates from non-permafrost soil in the floodplain of the Tanana River -- an extremely cold and mineral poor environment near Fairbanks, Alaska. To obtain the largest and most diverse collection of microbes possible, the researchers employed a range of media concentrations, added soil extract to the enrichment media, and performed extended incubations at low temperatures. Preliminary screening has identified at least 5 unique isolates with good antibiotic activity. The culture collection is arrayed in 96-well culture plates with 20 percent DMSO for preservation. 
P03154US

Libraries of Bacterial Genomic DNA Isolated from Alaskan Soils

UW-Madison researchers have compiled 10 libraries of bacterial genomic DNA isolated directly from non-permafrost soils in the floodplain of the Tanana River, an extremely cold and phosphorus poor environment near Fairbanks, Alaska. The 10 libraries, including nine bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries and one fosmid library, provide more than 63,000 clones with average insert sizes ranging from 1.5 to 47 kilobases in length. The largest inserts are over 150 kilobases in length. This collection of genomic DNA complements a collection of over 1,000 bacterial cultures isolated from the same Alaskan soils.
P04104US

Bacterial Genomic Libraries from Alaskan Soils (AK 9-13 and 16)

UW-Madison researchers have compiled six libraries of bacterial genomic DNA isolated directly from non-permafrost soils in the floodplain of the Tanana River, an extremely cold and phosphorus-poor environment near Fairbanks, Alaska. The six libraries contain almost 200,000 clones with average insert sizes ranging from 5 to 30 kilobases. This collection of genomic DNA complements a collection of over 1,000 bacterial cultures and 10 additional libraries of bacterial genomic DNA isolated from the same Alaskan soils (see WARF reference numbers P03154US and P04104US).
P05158US

Janthinobacterium lividium Isolates from Alaskan Soil

UW-Madison researchers have identified red- and purple-pigmented Janthinobacterium lividium isolates that have antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. These bacteria were isolated from non-permafrost soil in the floodplain of the Tanana River -- an extremely cold and mineral poor environment near Fairbanks, Alaska. The red and purple pigments, which are only produced at temperatures below 28º C, may play a role in the antibacterial activity. This collection of bacteria complements a collection of more than 1,000 bacterial cultures and 16 libraries of bacterial genomic DNA isolated from the same Alaskan soils (see links below).
P06058US

Collection of Bacterial Isolates from Alaska That Do Not Grow at Temperatures at or Above 37ºC

UW-Madison researchers have developed a culture collection of bacterial isolates that do not grow at temperatures above 37ºC. These bacteria were isolated from non-permafrost soil in the floodplain of the Tanana River—an extremely cold and mineral poor environment near Fairbanks, Alaska. This collection of bacterial cultures complements a collection of more than 1,000 bacterial cultures and 16 libraries of bacterial genomic DNA isolated from the same Alaskan soils (see links below).
P06059US

Collection of Genomic Fragments That Affect Quorum Sensing

This technology describes large genomic fragments cloned from Alaskan soil bacterial isolates that affect quorum sensing. A team of UW-Madison researchers collected bacterial isolates from non-permafrost soil in the floodplain of the Tanana River—an extremely cold and mineral poor environment near Fairbanks, Alaska. Large amounts of microbial DNA were isolated directly from the soil and then screened using a high throughput quorum sensing assay.
P06060US

Bacterial Genomic Libraries from Alaskan Soils (AK 19, 20 and 21)

UW-Madison researchers have compiled three libraries of bacterial genomic DNA isolated directly from non-permafrost soils in the floodplain of the Tanana River, an extremely cold and phosphorus-poor environment near Fairbanks, Alaska. This collection of genomic DNA complements a collection of more than 1,000 bacterial cultures and 18 additional libraries of bacterial genomic DNA isolated from the same Alaskan soils.
P06160US

Exploring Natural Products from Actinobacteria Symbionts Associated with Animals and Plants

A UW-Madison researcher has collected more than 150 unique strains of actinomycetes obtained from ants, bees, lichens, bark beetles and other macroorganisms. DNA sequencing has confirmed that these strains are novel, and thus have not been previously screened. Bioassays revealed the in vitro production of antifungal and antibacterial compounds by many of these strains.
P07080US

Bacterial Genomic Libraries from Alaskan Soils (AK 22 and 23)

UW-Madison researchers have compiled two libraries of bacterial genomic DNA isolated directly from non-permafrost soils in the floodplain of the Tanana River, an extremely cold and phosphorus-poor environment near Fairbanks, Alaska. This collection of genomic DNA complements a collection of more than 1,000 bacterial cultures and 19 additional libraries of bacterial genomic DNA isolated from the same Alaskan soils.
P07199US