Technologies

Veterinary

Most Recent Inventions

Predicting Male Fertility in Cattle

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a method for predicting whether a sperm sample will have high or low fertility based on average sperm head brightness. Generally, samples that exhibit brighter DNA staining have lower fertility.

In the process, a fresh or frozen sample is stained with DNA-binding fluorescent dye and imaged with a microscope. The brightness of the sperm head is averaged and compared with samples of known fertility.
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Plasmids Encoding Avian Influenza Genes

A UW-Madison researcher has developed plasmids encoding either the H3 N1 or the H5 N2 genes of avian influenza. These genes were cloned directly from viral isolates and are under the control of the pol II promoter.
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Ringworm Fungal Strain for Infection Studies

UW–Madison researchers have established that a strain of M. canis, called UW-8, is particularly useful in experimental infection studies. The strain produces a uniquely bright and consistent fluorescence that makes ringworm lesions much easier to identify and measure.

The researchers have used UW-8 for infection studies since 1993, and the attributes of the strain are supported by a body of peer-reviewed literature. UW-8 was selected from natural field strains and can be cultured readily.
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Isolated Canine Influenza H3N2 Virus for Vaccine Production

Researchers from the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory have obtained and identified isolated H3N2 influenza virus from canines that tested positive for influenza antigen during the 2015 epidemic. The virus has been amplified in eggs as well as cell culture (MDCK cells) for possible use in vaccine production.

These isolates were not previously shown to be circulating in the United States prior to 2015. They were originally identified from a canine nasal swab as influenza A at the WVDL, and the sample was then typed as an N2 strain using an in-house real-time PCR assay.
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Isolated Influenza H3N2 Virus for Potential Feline Vaccine

Researchers from the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory have isolated H3N2 influenza virus from felines infected during the 2016 outbreak. Characterization and sequencing efforts are ongoing.
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Most Recent Patents

Diagnostic Kit for Blastomycosis

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method for obtaining highly pure native BAD-1 protein that could be used to detect B. dermatitidis infection.

A solution containing native BAD-1 protein or fragments is collected from cultured fungus strains. The solution is combined with nickel-chelating resin, washed and eluted to obtain a highly pure form without the need for more expensive recombinant methods. This can be mixed and analyzed with a patient’s sample to determine if the fungus is present.
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Potential for Vaccine Against Johne’s Disease

UW–Madison researchers have developed MAP strains with mutated global gene regulators (GGRs) that may be utilized in a vaccine against Johne’s disease.

GGRs are proteins needed for initiating RNA synthesis, for example, sigma factors and transcriptional regulators. By deleting, inactivating or reducing some key GGR sequences in MAP bacteria, non-virulent strains could be produced and administered to animals to confer immunity.
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Vaccine Candidates Against Johne's Disease

A UW-Madison researcher has developed potential vaccine candidates for Johne’s disease. The disease is caused by the slow-growing bacterium Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, or M. paratuberculosis. The inventor identified several Mycobacterium strain-specific genes that may contribute to the pathogenicity of M. paratuberculosis. These genes could be used to design vaccines against pathogenic subspecies of M. avium, including M. paratuberculosis. In a recent study, vaccine preparations based on these sequences helped protect rodents against infection with M. paratuberculosis.
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