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The WARF Discovery Bulletin is published for University of Wisconsin–Madison faculty, staff and students by the WARF Communications Department, 614 Walnut Street, 13th Floor, Madison, Wisconsin, 53726.
 

WARF Discovery Bulletin Winter 2011

Carl Gulbrandsen, WARF Managing Director

From the Managing Director:

Advance Now assessment highlights UW role, challenges

A new report led by the regional economic development group Thrive highlights a fact that is well-known to all of us on campus: that the University of Wisconsin–Madison is the dominant source of innovation in south central Wisconsin.

What's more surprising—and concerning—about the report is the series of economic challenges it identifies in our region and the far-reaching effects those challenges may have on the university. The report calls for a series of new strategies, including greater efforts to leverage the strengths of UW–Madison, to help the region navigate current economic challenges and remain competitive in attracting high-value, sustainable jobs.

The 184-page competitive assessment was developed by Market Street, an Atlanta firm that specializes in strategies for regional economic development. It was conducted as part of a larger initiative called Advance Now that seeks to improve the economic outlook and potential for job creation in Columbia, Dane, Dodge, Green, Iowa, Jefferson, Rock and Sauk counties.

In its next phase, the Advance Now initiative will highlight the most important existing and emerging business clusters in the region. The final two phases of the project will feature creation of a visionary game plan for the next five years and an implementation plan that will help build greater momentum in the region.

Wisconsin State Journal Publisher Bill Johnston and I serve as co-chairs of the strategy committee for the Advance Now initiative. The committee includes 24 members from the region served by Thrive and represents the principal stakeholders involved in building the economy.

Members of our group recognize UW–Madison is a crown jewel in the region's economy and the Advance Now report confirms our campus outpaces the performance of research universities in benchmark communities such as Austin, Texas; Des Moines, Iowa; and Lincoln, Nebraska. For example, in 2009, UW–Madison spent $952 million on science and engineering research and development, ranking third in the nation, while in 2010, total university research and development expenditures topped $1 billion for the first time.

It's also worth highlighting that the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation was the top private sector patenting organization in the region with 399 patents between 2005 and 2009; WARF activities contributed to Madison's second-place ranking behind Austin, Texas, for the overall number of patents per 10,000 employees in the respective communities.

Yet, the findings in the competitive assessment also raise a number of concerns that we in the university community cannot afford to overlook. Among our region's challenges:
  • Per capita income in our region is below the national average and growing more slowly than among our peers. In 2009, the Madison region reported per capita income of $38,843, slightly below the national average of $39,635. Meanwhile, between 2004 and 2009, incomes here grew more slowly than in our competitors' communities with the exception of Des Moines, where incomes were already $3,000 or so higher.

  • Socioeconomic disparities within our region are dramatic with respect to income and educational attainment. For example, per capita income in the Janesville metropolitan statistical area (Rock County) was $32,102, some 20 percent below the U.S. average. In addition, while an exceptional 47.1 percent of Dane County residents hold a bachelor's degree or higher, the other counties in our region ranged from 25.6 of residents with a bachelor's degree in Jefferson to 14.2 percent in Dodge County.

  • Business vitality and access to capital need improvement. In contrast to growth patterns in the metro comparison regions, the number of Madison region companies of all employment sizes actually declined between 2004 and 2009 by 0.7 percent. The decline was especially steep among the smallest businesses; establishments with five to nine employees contracted by 2.6 percent. In 2010, the Madison region also had the lowest rate of small business loans per 1,000 residents among the benchmark communities at 10.8 percent.
These trends, as well as a rising poverty rate and relatively high cost of living noted in the report, touch the ground on campus in several important ways. Clearly, the residents of our region and our state are experiencing very real economic challenges that constrain the tax base and limit the ability to support public institutions of higher educations at desired, or even historically anticipated, levels.

At the same time, given the relatively low percentage of residents with four-year degrees outside of Dane County and the positive link between higher education and higher earnings, we can expect mounting pressure for access to UW–Madison and other institutions of higher education. This trend will continue despite the diminishing public revenue available to help expand capacity.

Finally, the report makes it clear that as a key economic driver in the region, the university will play a leading role in efforts to diversify the employment base and build sustainable job opportunities. The report notes the university's important efforts to support entrepreneurial activity and its contributions to the net in-migration of high-level scientific talent, yet it also highlights the belief among some community stakeholders that these innate strengths should be leveraged to greater effect.
 
In this regard, WARF stands ready to continue building on its historically strong relationships with the university community and with important external stakeholders including the business community and policymakers in a position to influence important aspects of our business climate. Through a variety of innovative programs, we are working to increase our patent and licensing activity and we remain committed to serving as a resource for new technology companies launched by campus inventors.

As the Advance Now process unfolds, we will continue to keep the campus community informed and as always, we welcome your comments and feedback.

Carl Gulbrandsen is managing director of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. He can be reached at 608.263.9395 or carl@warf.org.

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Engineer Dan van der Weide, left, and radiologist Fred Lee developed a new device that uses precisely focused microwaves to eliminate hard-to-treat tumors in patients with liver, lung and other cancers. NeuWave Medical, the company they launched to advance the technology, now employs 30 in Madison.
Engineer Dan van der Weide, left, and radiologist Fred Lee developed a new device that uses precisely focused microwaves to eliminate hard-to-treat tumors in patients with liver, lung and other cancers. NeuWave Medical, the company they launched to advance the technology, now employs 30 in Madison.

NeuWave Collaboration:

Shared values lead to improved patient care


Watch a video on the NeuWave Story

When it comes to launching a successful startup, shared values can help a good idea gain greater momentum. For University of Wisconsin–Madison engineer Dan van der Weide and radiologist Fred Lee, those shared values include investing in good people, taking a long-term approach to business and pursuing medical technologies that offer new hope to patients with few other options.

To achieve their goals and remain true to their values, six years ago the two decided to mortgage their homes and put their families' futures on the line rather than accept funds from outside investors whose goals conflicted with their own. In the years since, they've found that while some entrepreneurial challenges require a technical solution, the ability to sit down and work through issues with a common purpose has played an equally important role in their success.

Today, the company they founded, NeuWave Medical, employs 30 people in Madison. The first product, the Certus 140 Ablation System, uses precisely delivered microwave technology to destroy tumors in sensitive tissues including the liver, kidneys and lungs of patients unable to withstand the rigors of surgery. While the Certus device has been on the market for just one year, it already can be found in leading teaching and research hospitals around the nation.
 
As the probe destroys the tumor, it minimizes damage to the surrounding organ, burning away only enough tissue to prevent a recurrence of the cancer. Van der Weide, left, and Lee have numerous issued and pending patents to their names, but they decided to take a risk and launch a startup company based on the ablation technology because it seemed the most effective way to gain the necessary regulatory approvals and get the device into production for clinical use.
As the probe destroys the tumor, it minimizes damage to the surrounding organ, burning away only enough tissue to prevent a recurrence of the cancer. Van der Weide, left, and Lee have numerous issued and pending patents to their names, but they decided to take a risk and launch a startup company based on the ablation technology because it seemed the most effective way to gain the necessary regulatory approvals and get the device into production for clinical use.
"It wasn't easy to reach this point, but as a physician, there is no greater feeling than being able to improve a patient's life with a tool you've helped design for that specific purpose," said Dr. Lee, who is the Robert A. Turrel Professor of Imaging Science and senior vice chair of the department of radiology at UW–Madison's School of Medicine and Public Health. "I mean, what could be better than this?"

With the patented technology now entering the clinical mainstream, the benefits for patients are becoming more evident. For example, use of the minimally invasive ablation technique means a recovery time of just two to three days instead of the usual four to six weeks from major surgery. Instead of a major incision, a needle-like probe is used to destroy the tumor, thus eliminating the need for a lengthy post-operative hospital stay and use of blood transfusions.

The microwave ablation technology also has proven effective as a "bridge" technique to help seriously ill patients on the waiting list for a liver transplant. Patients with advanced liver disease typically have tumors present in their livers; yet current rules to manage the short supply of donor organs set strict criteria regarding the presence of tumors before patients can proceed with a transplant. The Certus system allows for the complete destruction of tumors without the risks or potential delays that accompany surgery and helps patients remain on the active waiting list.

While such benefits are clear now, van der Weide and Lee faced a slew of skeptics as they worked to perfect the product.

"In a way, it was helpful that I was coming from a background outside of medicine, because I didn't know how many other concepts had failed," said van der Weide, an electrical and computer engineering professor in UW–Madison's College of Engineering with several startups to his credit and 17 U.S. patents issued or pending. "But that's one of the benefits of true collaboration—where you have an intersection of ideas coming from different perspectives."

The idea to deliver a fatal dose of microwave energy to carefully targeted cancer cells occurred to van der Weide as he and Lee participated on a committee during a student's dissertation defense related to more conventional treatment options. Thanks to van der Weide's work with a variety of probes and sensors capable of analyzing everything from subsurface material defects in crystals to the composition of automotive exhaust gases, he recognized the possibilities.

After the concept proved successful, the two chose to patent the invention through the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation and license the technology for their own startup. Although they were not bound by prior agreements and investigated other options for patenting the device, van der Weide said they opted to work with WARF to better protect against infringement and provide future revenue to the university.

The two also briefly considered the notion of pursuing a relationship with a larger existing company to license and develop the technology. However, the expertise and network of support available through UW–Madison's College of Engineering and School of Medicine and Public Health convinced them that launching their own company would get the technology into clinical use for the benefit of patients in the most effective way.

The ability to lure experienced executive leadership and find regional suppliers also played a role in their decision to start the young company in Madison.
 
By using long, needle-like probes to pinpoint and destroy tumors, the technology provides a new option for patients who may be too ill or frail to withstand major surgery or other aggressive treatments.
By using long, needle-like probes to pinpoint and destroy tumors, the technology provides a new option for patients who may be too ill or frail to withstand major surgery or other aggressive treatments.
"We were able to find exceptional CEO talent with Laura King, who had extensive background leading GE Healthcare's cardiology and mammography businesses," van der Weide said. "And thanks to Wisconsin's strong base of medical device companies and manufacturing operations, we've been able to source 80 percent of our components from within the state.''

Also key to the company's founding were Chris Brace, now an assistant professor of radiology in the School of Medicine and Public Health, and Paul Laeseke, who earned an M.D. and Ph.D. through UW–Madison's medical scientist training program and is now completing his residency at the Stanford School of Medicine.

Lee said NeuWave anticipates hiring additional employees as several new products including a novel surgical cauterizing tool move through the development and approval process. Although van der Weide and Lee are no longer involved in the company's day-to-day operations, they continue to serve on the board of directors and play a strategic role in the company's technological progress.

"When we started putting our ideas together, we weren't sure where it would lead, but our motivation to have better tools to help patients has never wavered," Lee said. "We hope that by seeing the practical advantages of our collaboration between a doctor and an engineer, others will be inspired to pursue new interdisciplinary projects."

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Melanie Dart, UW–Madison School of Medicine and Public Health
Melanie Dart, UW–Madison School of Medicine and Public Health

Inventor Profile:

New diagnostic test for kidney disease promises to capture early warning signs


A simple blood test may soon diagnose the onset of debilitating kidney disease in diabetics.

Melanie Dart, an associate scientist at the University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, has been awarded a grant from the WARF Accelerator Program to move forward with development of the test that ultimately will advance patient care, improve physicians' ability to manage treatment and support development of needed pharmaceuticals.

Dart, a scientist in the department of surgery's division of transplantation, plans to use the Accelerator Program funding to take the next steps toward commercializing a blood test that indicates whether a diabetic patient is at risk for kidney disease.

The numbers lend a growing sense of urgency to her quest. With 26 million diabetics and 80 million pre-diabetics in the U.S., it is imperative to have better tools to identify life-threatening complications of the disease, says Dart. Screening for kidney disease is particularly important because 30 to 40 percent of diabetics ultimately experience kidney damage.

"The problem is that we still can't predict who is in that group," says Dart. "It isn't until doctors see a decline in a patient's kidney function that they will begin to treat the disease. But this is far from ideal."
 
The onset of kidney disease poses a particular health risk for diabetics. The screen image highlights what scientist Melanie Dart's microscope reveals as inflammation and fibrosis take a toll on healthy kidney cells.
The onset of kidney disease poses a particular health risk for diabetics. The screen image highlights what scientist Melanie Dart's microscope reveals as inflammation and fibrosis take a toll on healthy kidney cells.
Dart chose to focus on the challenge soon after earning a doctorate in cellular and molecular pathology from UW–Madison in 2007. She began collaborating with scientist Debra Hullett, also of UW–Madison's School of Medicine and Public Health, and after exploring a series of issues related to kidney transplantation and chronic rejection, they realized it might be possible to predict with a test whether a diabetic patient would get kidney disease.

Their strategy in addressing the challenge has been influenced by a growing body of evidence indicating that inflammation may drive kidney disease progression both before and in parallel with fibrosis development.

"The new theory is about inflammation in the kidney itself," says Dart. "In the disease process, inflammatory cells appear to infiltrate the kidney, thereby interacting with resident cells and activating them."

Activated kidney cells can produce scar-forming proteins, which in turn create excess scar tissue. As kidney cells become damaged, patients experience a decline in function that can result in kidney failure.

Realizing that the early stages of the process might be identifiable in diabetic patient blood samples, Dart designed an approach in the lab to mimic the natural environment of the kidney. First, she cultured a stable kidney epithelial cell line. To this she introduced diabetic patients' immune cells isolated from the peripheral blood. She then investigated whether the two cell types, when grown together in culture, induced a pro-fibrotic response.

"Our preliminary data indicated that the test is diagnostic when we test diabetics," says Dart.

Buoyed by these results, Dart plans to use the WARF Accelerator Program funding to investigate the mechanisms behind the fibrosis process in kidney cells driven by inflammatory cells of diabetics and use the information to develop patient-specific therapies. She also hopes to learn more about the specificity and sensitivity of the diagnostic blood test. She is performing the pilot study in the research lab of Dr. Hans Sollinger, who currently serves as her mentor.

"We've tested two extreme patient populations—healthy people and those with full blown kidney disease," she says. "So this next phase is designed to test everyone in the middle, such as diabetics with early-stage kidney disease or those who have yet to develop kidney disease."

It helps that the test requires only a simple blood draw, taken just once. Dart has learned too that patients are very excited and willing to participate.

"I find that many patients are very educated about their disease and happy to have the chance to help out," says Dart. "If this works, it would be incredible."

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New Tools for Researchers:

The latest in new lab equipment is waiting for you in the teaching labs at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery


Companies including Eppendorf, Fotodyne, Leica, Nikon, Nuhsbaum and Thermo Fisher Scientific have provided nearly $2 million worth of the latest in microscopes, sample analysis systems and other equipment available for campus-wide trial use and to support outreach efforts.

Zack Robbins, associate director of development for the Morgridge Institute for Research, said the loaned equipment at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery is made even more valuable by service and training agreements with the manufacturers.

"These loan and service agreements are much more valuable than straightforward equipment donations because they ensure scientists throughout campus have ongoing access to the very latest technology and training on how to use it," said Robbins, who worked with the manufacturers as part of the Morgridge Institute's efforts to spark interdisciplinary research and public-private collaboration. "The companies are able to get direct feedback on their equipment and from a research perspective, there are papers being published based on findings made possible by the technology."

The Nikon N-STORM system provides dramatically enhanced resolution that is 10 times or better than that of conventional optical microscopes. Photo courtesy of Nikon
The Nikon N-STORM system provides dramatically enhanced resolution that is 10 times or better than that of conventional optical microscopes. Photo courtesy of Nikon
Troy Dassler, lab and outreach manager with the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, said access to the equipment also has been helpful to some researchers in assessing whether it will be a good fit for their labs.

"These are amazing pieces of equipment, but depending on the work of a specific lab, it may or may not be what's needed," Dassler said. "This is a great opportunity to put the technology through its paces. We've had several faculty members come in and use the microscopes to write grant proposals. Others have decided to buy their own models after checking it out."

The equipment is focused on the physical and biological sciences; highlights include molecular spectroscopy equipment as well as an N-STORM microscope from Nikon. STORM is an acronym for Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscope and the device provides resolution that is at least 10 times better than that of conventional optical microscopes thanks to the use of special fluorescent dyes for sample preparation. "Nikon developed the technology in partnership with Harvard and there are only a few like this in the world," Dassler said. "We have it here as part of a partnership with Ronald Kalil's lab at the University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Medicine and Public Health and it's a tremendous opportunity."

Another microscope, the Raman microscope, features a laser that is used to excite molecules and other tools that make it useful for direct chemical imaging.

"It's been great having researchers from a variety of disciplines coming together and using the same equipment for different things," Dassler said. "And the best part is that this is a win-win for everyone, because having this technology on hand allows us to introduce these concepts to the K–12 students who visit us. We are extremely grateful to the development team at the Morgridge Institute for Research for making this possible."

Laura Heisler, director of programming for WARF, said managing the contract agreements and providing access to the equipment through the teaching labs are among the ways WARF aims to support collaborations that extend across campus and throughout the community.

In the months ahead, a number of the companies are expected to hold demonstration days to highlight the capabilities of their equipment. Thermo Fisher opened the series with a well-attended event on November 17. Future events will be promoted on the Town Center website, discovery.wisc.edu/events.
 
A complete listing of the equipment along with a reservation form can be found at discovery.wisc.edu/equipment.

Each piece of equipment is available for trial use of 10 hours. After the 10-hour trial period, a fee structure applies.

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Tom Still
Tom Still

Technology Insights:

Geron's move highlights hurdles to bringing stem cell therapies to market


MADISON – The decision by a California company to halt its study of a stem cell-based treatment for spinal cord injuries is less about whether such therapies will work than the monumental regulatory and financial hurdles that stand in the way.

In a move with implications for Wisconsin researchers and companies working with embryonic stem cells, Geron Corp. announced in November it will stop spending $25 million a year to bring a stem cell treatment to market.

The reasons are clear: It would have taken up to 10 years to develop a treatment that meets with U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval, so Geron's executives decided to put their money behind other experimental products that could get to market faster.

Geron executives and researchers outside the company remain confident in the science behind the spinal cord treatment, which has worked in laboratory animals, but the long and arduous pathway to win FDA approval appeared to be too much to overcome.
 
Geron's decision likely won't slow academic research with human embryonic stem cells, but it does highlight the challenges companies face in gaining FDA approval for use of the cells in new treatments and cures.
Geron's decision likely won't slow academic research with human embryonic stem cells, but it does highlight the challenges companies face in gaining FDA approval for use of the cells in new treatments and cures.
The Menlo Park, Calif., company had long been viewed as the leader in stem cell therapies, thanks to patents on technology used to grow, manipulate and inject embryonic stem cells into the human body. Stem cells are cells capable of morphing into any one of more than 220 human cell types. Many of the patents licensed to Geron were the result of work performed at UW–Madison, where researcher Dr. James Thomson and his team first isolated embryonic stem cells in 1998.

Is Geron's decision a setback to the U.S. stem cell research industry? Not necessarily so, because most research is still funded through academic channels. Also, Geron was focused on a specific therapy—mending damaged spinal cords—while companies elsewhere are developing other uses for stem cells.

Cellular Dynamics International, a Madison company founded by Thomson and others, is a ready example. Thomson has long insisted that stem cell "cures" or treatments were years in the future, given the revolutionary nature of what is still a very young field of science. His company has focused instead on using stem cells for disease modeling, testing new drugs, diagnostics and other research applications.

"For us, it validates the basic business plan: Steer clear of therapeutics for the foreseeable future," said Dr. Tim Kamp, director of the stem cell medical program at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and a co-founder of CDI.

Business plans for any U.S. company involved in seeking biotechnology cures, treatments or diagnostics must include seeking necessary approvals from the FDA, which regulates development of drugs, medical devices, biologics, vaccines and more. Increasingly, however, the bioscience industry has complained about the FDA's regulatory pace. For example, the president of the national Biotechnology Industry Organization, former member of Congress Jim Greenwood, called on federal lawmakers to "build a 21st century FDA" or risk losing U.S. competitiveness in the life sciences.

"The Geron experience underscores how broken the FDA process has become in this country," said Carl Gulbrandsen, managing director of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. WARF is the private, nonprofit group that handles UW–Madison patents and licenses them to potential users.

Others say the FDA is simply being cautious in the wake of some high-profile drug failures and because its regulators, like others in the field, are new to stem cell research. Still, skeptics say the system has become so cumbersome that innovation is being stifled.

"Geron spent about $45 million to prepare its IND (Investigational New Drug application) alone. There aren't many companies that can afford to do that," Gulbrandsen said.

For many years, the biggest threat to stem cell research came from opponents who questioned the ethics of how the cells themselves were derived. Today, it appears, an emerging challenge may be the possibility that researchers and investors frustrated by paperwork and costs go outside the United States to develop stem cell therapies that should be kept home.

Tom Still is president of the Wisconsin Technology Council. He is the former associate editor of the Wisconsin State Journal.

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At Your Service:

After discovery, think disclosure!


After your eureka moment, but before you let anyone know about your discovery, the members of WARF's intellectual property team want to hear from you. They are your best resource for determining if a patent should be filed to protect your patent rights for your invention.

WARF wants to assess whether your discovery is:
  • Novel, useful and non-obvious (the basic patent criteria established by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office);

  • Marketable, with commercial and societal value projected; and

  • Appropriate for a patent or other intellectual property protection.
Before you publicly share your discovery, submit an invention disclosure report to a member of WARF's intellectual property team. The short invention disclosure reports are available online.

Actions that may disqualify an invention from earning a patent include premature web postings, presentations, abstracts, papers, grant applications and department seminars.

For more information, contact WARF at 608.263.2500 or visit our employee directory for a list of individual intellectual property team members.

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A listing of events and opportunities for investors and entrepreneurs


January 7 | 10 a.m.
Saturday Science at Discovery
Saving Money, Time and Energy

Learn about saving money, time and energy with practical information and ideas. Organized by the WARF programming team, this monthly series consists of free science exploration and education programs aimed at families and learners of all ages.

Location: Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery
330 N. Orchard St., Madison, Wis.
Cost: Free and open to the public


January 12 & 13 | 8:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Product Manager Imperatives
Learn about the roles, expectations and essential tools of product management during this two-day course. Hosted by the Executive Education program of the Wisconsin School of Business, the course provides a sense of the "discipline" needed for success by highlighting strategic tools and thought processes, as well as tips for overcoming common product management pitfalls.

Location: Fluno Center
601 Univesity Ave., Madison, Wis.
Contact: (800) 348-8964; http://exed.wisc.edu/Courses/Product-Manager-Imperatives
Cost: $1,390


January 17 | 5:30 to 7 p.m.
Business Startup Series Orientation
Entrepreneurial Training Program

This comprehensive combination of courses aims to help entrepreneurs develop business skills and attract financing. The program is available for entrepreneurs involved in startup ventures and business expansions with fewer than 50 employees. Organized by the Small Business Development Center at the Wisconsin School of Business, the sessions guide participants through the process of writing a business plan with the intent of securing financing.

Entrepreneurs interested in participating must submit an application no later than January 6. For an application to be accepted, candidates will need a feasible business idea; the capability to write a business plan; relevant experience and training; and the financial ability to start the proposed business. An accepted application is required to attend the orientation event.

Class sessions include Small Business: The Fundamentals, held Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6:30 to 9 p.m. January 24 to February 16; and Developing a Business Plan, held on Mondays from 6:30 to 9 p.m. February 20 to March 26.

Location: Grainger Hall
975 University Ave., Madison, Wis.
Contact: (608) 263-7680; http://sbdc.wisc.edu/startup/etp
Cost: Approved enrollees pay $250 and save 75 percent of the full $1,000 fee by completing the program requirements.


January 18 | 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Small Business Tax Expo
Learn about federal and state taxes including payroll, unemployment compensation and sales taxes. Created by Wisconsin Small Business Development Centers, Wisconsin Department of Revenue, Wisconsin Institute of CPAs and Internal Revenue Service, the program covers a wide variety of business and tax issues. The morning session features: an introduction to payroll taxes; the difference between employee and independent contractor status; workers compensation and withholding issues; and selecting a legal business entity. The afternoon breakout sessions are taught by accountants and cover details specific to various business entities.

Location: Grainger Hall
975 University Ave., Madison, Wis.
Contact: (608) 262-3909; http://sbdc.wisc.edu/startup/sbtaxexpo
Cost: $79


Jan. 24 to Feb. 16 | Tuesdays and Thursdays | 6:30 to 9 p.m.
Startup Business Solutions
This eight-session course helps participants develop management skills and acquire knowledge in a variety of critical areas including law, accounting, banking, insurance, management and marketing. The course is organized by the Small Business Development Center at the Wisconsin School of Business. Session topics are:
  • small business and the owner/manager;
  • marketing: developing your overall strategy;
  • promoting your product or service;
  • record keeping, accounting and taxes;
  • legal issues and requirements;
  • financing your business;
  • human resources; and
  • insurance and risk management
Location: Grainger Hall
975 University Ave., Madison, Wis.
Contact: (608) 262-3909; http://sbdc.wisc.edu/startup/sbf/
Cost: $250 ($199 for each additional enrollee from same organization)


January 30 | 6:30 p.m.
Discovering Careers in Health Care and the Life Sciences
This is a program in a series of seven designed for students interested in a career in health care or life sciences research. It is sponsored by the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery and the UW–Madison Center for Pre-Health Advising.

Location: Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery
330 N. Orchard St., Madison, Wis.
Cost: Free and open to the public


February 4 | 10 a.m.
Saturday Science at Discovery
Inspiring Future Innovators Now!

Learn how inventors young and old can bring their discoveries to life.

Location: Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery
330 N. Orchard St., Madison, Wis.
Cost: Free and open to the public


February 9, 16 & 23 | 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Supervisory Leadership Series
Supervision is a key factor in the success of any business that has employees. Offered by the Small Business Development Center at the Wisconsin School of Business, this series provides an opportunity for core supervisory leadership skills development with a minimum time commitment. Participants may choose individual programs, but participants benefit most from taking the entire series—and save 10 percent on the cost of the individual sessions. Program sessions include: essentials of leadership and coaching; communication and delegation skills; and managing conflict.

Location: Grainger Hall
975 University Ave., Madison, Wis.
Contact: (608) 262-3909; http://sbdc.wisc.edu/leadership/sls/
Cost: $569 for all three programs (saves 10 percent from individual session fees).

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Contact Us


The WARF Discovery Bulletin is published by WARF Communications, 614 Walnut Street, 13th Floor, Madison, Wisconsin, 53726. Please send comments or story ideas to discoverybulletin@warf.org or contact:
Janet Kelly, communications director, jkelly@warf.org, 608.890.1491
Jennifer Sereno, senior editor, jsereno@warf.org, 608.770.8084
Devon Cournoyer, project manager, dcournoyer@warf.org, 608.890.1621