Technologies

Agriculture

Most Recent Inventions

Genetic Testing for Acquired Peripheral Neuropathy in Dogs

UW–Madison researchers have identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that is predictive of APN syndrome in dogs, based on a genome-wide association study. Using a population of Labrador retrievers (56 cases and 26 controls), the researchers have shown that a SNP on CFA1 tags the causal variant for APN in the Labrador retriever breed.
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Lignin-Derived Aldehydes as Antifungal Agents

UW–Madison researchers have identified a set of compounds within the lignin biosynthesis pathway that exhibit pronounced antifungal activity against both plant and animal pathogens. The compounds are: p-hydroxycoumaryl aldehyde, coniferyl aldehyde and sinapyl aldehyde.

They show inhibition of the plant pathogens Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (‘white mold’), Alternaria solani (early blight), Alternaria alternata (leaf spot, etc.) as well as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the human pathogen Candida albicans, which is responsible for a host of infections prevalent in immunocompromised patients. Additionally, the compounds show strong inhibition of the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora, displaying complete inhibition of growth at 250 µg/mL.
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Cranberry Variety Named “Ruby Star” with Consistent High Yield

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a new variety of cranberry known as “Ruby Star.” Ruby Star resulted from a cross between the “HyRed” cranberry (“Stevens” x “Ben Lear #8”) and the “Bergman” cranberry (“Early Black” x “Searles”).

Growers interested in this cranberry variety should license the variety from WARF and obtain vines from one of the approved propagators listed below. The license between WARF and the grower must be in place before vines can be obtained.
  • Cranberry Creek Cranberries Inc.
  • Dempze Cranberry Co.
P120284US01

Preen Oil: The Nutritional Approach to Chronic Inflammation

UW–Madison researchers have developed methods of using preen oil as a food supplement to treat chronic inflammation in human and non-human animals, birds and fish.

Preen oil may be given orally as a pharmaceutical composition, added to human food products or included in animal, bird or fish food. The fatty acids in the oil accumulate in tissues where they inhibit the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1 and IL-6 and reduce chronic inflammation, including chronic joint inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases.
P160017US01

New Software Algorithm Advances Measurement Technology in Agribusiness

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new scanning algorithm for use in assessing yield and quality of crop production.

To determine characteristics such as kernel loading on an ear of corn and ear size, researchers scan up to three ears at a time using a common flatbed scanner. To measure 100 kernel weight, another common yield measurement, researchers weigh a handful of individual kernels and scatter them on the scanner. The resulting images are then analyzed using the algorithm to quickly provide yield data.

The algorithm uses a thresholding technique to separate the ears from the background and a Fourier transform to more accurately estimate kernel length. It also corrects for individual kernels clustering together.
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Most Recent Patents

New Protein Production Strategy for Plants

UW–Madison researchers have identified a new plant viral IRES that can facilitate the efficient expression of multiple proteins from a single mRNA. The researchers discovered the new IRES in the Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), a wheat virus that expresses 10 proteins from a single mRNA strand.
P140069US02

Combatting Parasitic Worms in Livestock and Other Animals

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method for treating gastrointestinal worm infections in animals and humans by administering interleukin-10 (IL-10) peptides and antibodies. IL-10 is a natural feed additive that can be ingested. Critically, helminthes have no known mechanism to develop resistance.
P140283US01

Cooling Bed for Livestock

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new cooling mat for livestock that circulates chilled water through elastic conduction channels. Unlike existing systems that require an interfering layer of bedding, the new design provides greater heat exchange because the chilled surface is placed directly beneath a reclining animal. A layer of cushioning beneath the water channels provides support and comfort.
P130304US02