Technologies

Agriculture : Plant varieties

Agriculture Portfolios

Technologies

Cranberry Variety Named “Ruby Star” with Consistent High Yield

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a new variety of cranberry known as “Ruby Star.” Ruby Star resulted from a cross between the “HyRed” cranberry (“Stevens” x “Ben Lear #8”) and the “Bergman” cranberry (“Early Black” x “Searles”).

Growers interested in this cranberry variety should license the variety from WARF and obtain vines from one of the approved propagators listed below. The license between WARF and the grower must be in place before vines can be obtained.
  • Cranberry Creek Cranberries Inc.
  • Dempze Cranberry Co.
P120284US01

"Tundra" (W2310-3), a Chipping Potato for Longer Cold Storage

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new potato line for chipping, called ‘Tundra,’ which holds outstanding potential for long-term storage at temperatures below the current industry level. Chipping quality can be maintained during storage for up to eight months at 42-50 degrees Fahrenheit. Tubers have lighter fry color and higher specific gravity than the Snowden variety.
P09325US

Oat Variety Containing More Heart Healthy Fiber

A UW–Madison researcher has bred oats with higher beta-glucan levels. The plants contain up to eight percent beta-glucan content by total fiber weight. The researchers spent 15 years using natural breeding techniques to develop the new oats, of the variety X8787-1. The plants are capable of normal breeding, seed and tissue production.
P130166US01

Cranberry Variety Trade Named "Sundance," with Large Berry Size and Favorable Bud Set Traits

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new variety of cranberry with the trade name “Sundance.” This variety was developed through a cross of the “Stevens” cultivar and a seedling selection of “Ben Lear” that offers significantly improved traits over its “Ben Lear” parent. “Sundance” is superior to the predominant cranberry cultivar “Stevens” in fruit size, overall coloration, yield potential and flower bud set. Also, under high crop loads, “Sundance” tolerates high levels of fertilizer to improve yield and flower bud set without causing excessive vine growth. Researchers believe that the improved fruit quality of “Sundance,” specifically larger size and solid cell structure, will result in an improved variety for sweetened dried cranberry production.

Growers interested in this cranberry variety should license the variety from WARF and obtain vines from one of the approved propagators listed below. The license between WARF and the grower must be in place before vines can be obtained.
  • Cranberry Creek Cranberries Inc.
  • Dempze Cranberry Co.
P100154US01

Plants and Seeds of Corn Comprising Brown Midrib and gt1 Genes

UW-Madison researchers have developed lines of corn that are homozygous for brown midrib and grassy-tiller1 genes. Corn including these two genes is bred for vigorous growth, uniformity and phenotypic stability. The enhanced regrowth leads to increased quantity and the reduced lignin leads to increased quality in the resultant forage.
P05229US

A Multiple-Eared Inbred Line of Corn for Production of “Baby Corn”

UW-Madison researchers have developed a variety of corn that produces a high yield of baby corn. This homozygous, phenotypically stable variety, called W701BC, produces 15 or more ears per plant in good conditions. Additionally, at approximately three feet tall, this variety is relatively short and therefore easier to harvest by hand.
P05295US

High Pigment Golden Beets

UW-Madison researchers have developed a superior gold beet variety with high levels of betaxanthins. It can be used as a nutritious food as well as a source of betaxanthin pigment.
P04345US

High-Yielding Oat Variety Called "Esker"

A team of UW-Madison researchers has developed a new, high-yielding oat variety with improved disease resistance, agronomic and grain quality traits. This variety, named “Esker”, has kernels that are well-filled, yellow and non-fluorescent. Plants are intermediate in height with medium length leaves. Esker matures midseason and has consistently performed well in trials replicated over several years in many locations.
P04397US

Superior Winter-Hardy Plum Cultivars

BlackIce™ Plum is the result of a cross between the ‘Oka’ cherry plum and a conventional Japanese dessert plum (Prunus salicina) known as ‘Z’s Blue Giant.’ Oka has in its lineage P. besseyi, a native North American plum species adapted to northern climes. P. besseyi can withstand severe winters and generally is more productive and ripens one month earlier than P. americana, a native plum more commonly used to produce hardiness in new hybrids. BlackIce™ Plum yields fruit that rivals many California-grown dessert plums in flavor and appearance, and matures two to four weeks earlier than any other large, high-quality plum grown in the Midwestern U.S. BlackIce™ Plum also grows and yields fruit in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s hardiness zone 3b (-30 to -35 degrees Fahrenheit) and above, making it suitable for production in northern climates. BlackIce™ Plum exhibits a naturally compact growth habit and good graft compatibility with most common plum rootstocks. The new plum cultivar also shows average susceptibility to brown rot (Monilinia fructicola) and black knot (Dibotryon morbosum), and is more tolerant to bacterial spot (Xanthomonas campestris pv. Pruni) when compared to most Japanese-American hybrids grown in the Midwest.
T03019US

“Freedom Russet” (W1836-3rus): A Dual Purpose Russet

A team of UW-Madison plant breeders has created a new, dual purpose (process/fresh market) russet potato that is adapted to the short season conditions of central Wisconsin. This variety, ‘W 1836-3rus,’ has long, blocky, russet tubers with light eye spots and an attractive appearance. W 1836-3rus also has medium-late vine maturity.
P00244US

High-Yielding Oat Variety Called “Drumlin”

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new high-yield oat variety, called Drumlin. Drumlin has been successfully grown in tests at many locations in the northern United States and southern Canada. This variety matures a few days later than Moraine, an early-maturity line also developed by UW-Madison researchers.
P03266US

"Villetta Rose" (W2275-3R), a Red Skin Potato Line for Fresh Market and Canning

A team of UW-Madison researchers has developed a new red skin potato line, called "Villetta Rose," for fresh market, canning and gourmet use (steamers). This variety has medium-late maturity and is particularly well-suited for canning. It has high tuber set; a uniform, round tuber shape; smooth, shallow eyes; uniform tuber size; good skin set; dark-red color at harvest; and white flesh. The tubers have a very attractive appearance. They are somewhat smaller than comparable varieties and the yield is in the medium range.
P03160US

"Mega Chip" (W1201), an Early Bulking, White Potato for Chipping

A team of UW-Madison researchers has developed a superior white potato variety for chipping, called "Mega Chip." This variety shows good chip color when processed from the field and maintains its color through five months storage at 48 degrees Fahrenheit. It also exhibits greater resistance to common scab, a major potato disease, than the leading variety Snowden. The round-oval tubers have white, slightly netted skin and white flesh. This variety also has high specific gravity and low sugar content.
P01300US

"White Pearl" (W-1355-1), a Chipping Potato for Cold Storage Conditions

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new potato line for chipping, called "White Pearl," which holds outstanding potential for long-term storage at temperatures below the current industry level. Chipping quality can be maintained during storage for up to nine months at 42 degrees Fahrenheit. Tubers have light netted skin and white flesh and are very uniform with a medium-size profile. The variety also exhibits medium-late to late vine maturity, medium yields, and medium solids.
P00343US

Cranberry Variety Trade Named "HyRed"

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new and distinct variety of cranberry with the trade name ‘HyRed,’ which is an early-maturing, high-color cranberry hybrid. HyRed is of value in all agricultural regions, but is particularly suitable for regions with short growing seasons. This variety is derived from a cross between the ‘Stevens’ variety and an assortment of seedlings from the ‘Ben Lear’ selection designated as Ben Lear No. 8. The short seasonal maturity of this hybrid allows farmers in regions with colder fall weather to harvest their cranberries after full development of fruit color. In other agricultural regions, the early coloration allows an extension of the harvest season.

Growers interested in this cranberry variety should license the variety from WARF and obtain vines from one of the approved propagators listed below. The license between WARF and the grower must be in place before vines can be obtained.
  • Cranberry Creek Cranberries Inc.
  • Dempze Cranberry Co.
  • Evergreen Nursery Co. Inc
  • Fanning Cranberry Co.
  • Robert A. Donaldson
P01289US

Early-Maturing Oat Variety Called "Moraine"

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new oat variety, called Moraine. Moraine is an early-maturity line designed for the early maturing oat growing areas of the Upper Midwest. The plants are intermediate to tall in height, with leaves of medium length. The kernels are well filled, yellow and non-fluorescent.
P01285US

High Pigment Beet

UW–Madison researchers have developed novel high pigment beet varieties. These varieties have betalain concentrations at levels suitable for commercial purification and subsequent use as food colorants.
P95261US

Inbred Table Beet W427A and W427B

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new line of beets. W427 is an inbred table beet line with excellent exterior smoothness and good uniformity of type. It also has multigerm seed, a round to blocky-shaped root, green foliage, rounded leaves, a small crown and a small taproot. W427A and 427B were derived from the cross [W371 x (W365 x W416)]. W416 and W365 are unreleased inbred lines, while W371 is a smooth and uniform, inbred, multigerm line that was previously released by the University of Wisconsin Table Beet Breeding Program. W427A is a red-anthered sterile and W427B is the maintainer genotype.
P00202US

Inbred Carrot Lines W279A and W279B

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new line of carrots. W279A (sterile) and W279B (maintainer) represent long Chantenay type, inbred carrot lines with medium green foliage. W279 was derived from a cross between W267, an unreleased, inbred line, and W233, an inbred line previously released by the University of Wisconsin Carrot Breeding Program.
P00223US

Inbred Table Beet W434A and W434B

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new line of beets. W434 is an inbred table beet line with multigerm seed, a cylindrical root, green/red foliage, intermediate leaves (partially rounded and partially strap-shaped), a small crown, a slightly tapered taproot, good smoothness and uniformity of type. W434A and W434B were obtained from the cross [Forono x (W330 x W416)]; W330 and W416 are unreleased, inbred lines. W434A is a sterile genotype with reddish-brown anthers and W434B is the maintainer genotype.
P01010US

Inbred Table Beet W443A and W443B

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new line of beets. W443 is an inbred table beet line possessing excellent exterior smoothness and very good uniformity of type. In addition, W443 has mostly multigerm seed with a small portion of duogerm, a round root, green foliage and a good crown. It was derived from the cross W429 x W364. W364 is an inbred line previously released by the University of Wisconsin Table Beet Breeding Program that is multigerm with a smooth, uniform root. For information on table beet line W429, see WARF reference number P01009US. W443A is a sterile genotype with pinkish-brown anthers and 443B is the maintainer genotype.
P01011US

Inbred Table Beet W446A and W446B

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new line of beets. W446 is an inbred table beet line with a good exterior and uniformity of type. It also possesses multigerm seed, a short cylindrical root, green/red foliage, and a small crown. W446A and 446B were derived from the cross [W364 x (Forono x (W416 x W395))]. W416 and W395 are unreleased inbred lines, while W364 is a multigerm line that was previously released by the University of Wisconsin Table Beet Breeding Program. W446A is a red-anthered sterile and W446B is the maintainer genotype.
P01012US

Inbred Carrot Lines W280A and W280B

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new line of carrots. Inbred carrot line W280 is a long Danvers type with a tapered root and light green foliage. W280 was derived from a cross between the unreleased inbred lines, W261 and W262. W280A is a green petaloid sterile and W280B is the maintainer genotype.
P01013US

Inbred Carrot Line W281C

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new line of carrots. Inbred carrot line W281C is a long Nantes type with excellent color and canned product quality. It was derived from the cross [(W267 x W259) x (W259 x W267)]. W267 is an unreleased inbred line, while W259 is an inbred line previously released by the University of Wisconsin Carrot Breeding Program that possesses exceptional color and flavor. Based on pedigree, W281C is very similar to W259, but has normal cytoplasm and carries alleles for fertility at the nuclear restorer locus. In addition, the foliage of W281C is slightly superior to Lucky B, a processing carrot hybrid produced from inbred lines previously released by the Carrot Breeding Program.
P01014US

Inbred Carrot Lines WAY274A and WAY274B

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new line of carrots. WAY274A (green petaloid sterile) and WAY274B (maintainer) are inbred, carrot lines possessing superior resistance to the plant disease aster yellows, which is caused by a mycoplasma-like organism and spread by the aster leafhopper, Macrosteles fascifrons stal. During three years of field trials, less than 8% of WAY274 plants per plot were infected with aster yellows, compared with an average of 24% among six commercial cultivars. WAY274 is a long Nantes type with medium green foliage. The line was derived from a cross between Scarlet Nantes and the unreleased population Aster Yellows Synthetic 1983, followed by a cross with the unreleased, inbred line W262.
P01015US

Red Kidney Bean Germplasm and Varieties

A team of researchers has now developed two new varieties of red kidney beans. Both varieties are resistant to the root rot pathogens Aphanomyces and Pythium. The varieties produce upright plants with long pods and dark-red beans of the proper size, shape and color for canning. These varieties are superior to others both in terms of yield and canning quality.
P01073US

Disease Resistant Alfalfa Populations

A UW-Madison researcher has now developed several populations of alfalfa that exhibit a high level of resistance to Aphanomyces Race 1 and Race 2 and Phytophthora medicaginis. The populations have been selected for several traits related to disease resistance and plant longevity. Two of the populations are very competitive with commercial varieties as forage crops. The other populations are currently undergoing field tests and show yields comparable to commercial lines. These populations may be valuable themselves as commercial varieties or they may serve as a source of Race 2 resistance for other commercial lines.
P01169US

Calcium-Rich Snap Bean Genotype

UW-Madison researchers have now developed a snap bean cultivar with high calcium content in the pods. Snap bean pods from this line contain approximately 20 percent more calcium than other common snap bean cultivars.
P02251US

Four New Sweet Corn Inbreds Containing the sh2 Allele

A UW-Madison researcher has now developed several new sweet corn inbreds carrying the sh2 mutation. Three of the inbreds have been tested in hybrid combinations for at least three seasons and yield hybrids with good to excellent quality. These inbreds have yellow germplasm. A fourth inbred line has very high quality, flavor and texture and is useful as a male.
P02305US

An Inbred Table Beet with a Root Suitable for Slicing

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new beet variety, called W433, with a cylindrical, straight root that is well suited for slicing. W433 A is the sterile cytoplasm, while W433 B is the fertile maintainer that can be used in hybrid production. Hybrids could be used for both processing and fresh markets.
P03054US

A Monogerm Round-Type Inbred Table Beet

UW-Madison researchers have developed a monogerm inbred table beet called W448. This variety results in a round-type beet and is similar to a popular variety available only as a multigerm. W448 A is the sterile cytoplasm, while W448 B is the fertile cytoplasm maintainer to be used in hybrid production. Hybrids could be used for processing or in fresh markets.
P03055US

Soybean Lines with Superior Resistance to Sclerotinia Stem Rot

A team of UW-Madison plant pathologists has now selected and developed several soybean lines with high resistance to Sclerotinia stem rot. The team used a highly efficient petiole inoculation technique to evaluate soybean germplasm for resistance to S. sclerotiorum. Once resistant plants were identified, the researchers employed a selection procedure aimed at increasing the frequency of these plants in breeding lines. In this procedure, only seed from plants that survived multiple rounds of petiole inoculation with S. sclerotiorum was used to create breeding populations. These breeding lines can be used to create commercial soybean cultivars with superior resistance to Sclerotinia infection.
P03286US

High Pigment Golden Beets

UW-Madison researchers have developed a superior gold beet variety with high levels of betaxanthins. It can be used as a nutritious food as well as a source of betaxanthin pigment.
P05099US

W1386: A High-Yield Chipstock Potato with Excellent Specific Gravity and Long-Term Storage Potential

UW-Madison researchers have developed W1386, a potato variety well suited for potato chip processing. W1386 is a round/oval, white-skinned potato.
P05356US

White Mold & Root Rot Resistant Dark Red Kidney Bean with Superior Agronomic & Processing Qualities

UW-Madison researchers have developed several high yielding kidney bean lines that are resistant to white mold and root rot. The lines were created by crossing kidney bean lines with intermediate white mold resistance to root rot-resistant lines and selecting for plants that are highly resistant to white mold. They may be used by commercial bean producers to eliminate the need for treating beans with fungicide in the Midwest and other areas where white mold is a problem, or by organic farmers where chemical spraying is not an option.
P06049US

Root Rot Resistant Snap Bean Cultivars

UW-Madison researchers have developed root rot resistant snap bean cultivars. They crossed and backcrossed a root rot resistant Mexican landrace with commercial cultivars to develop lines that combine root rot resistance with improved pod and plant quality traits.
P06320US

Root Rot Resistant Snap Bean Cultivars

UW-Madison researchers have developed root rot resistant snap bean cultivars. They crossed and backcrossed a root rot resistant Mexican landrace with commercial cultivars to develop lines that combine root rot resistance with improved pod and plant quality traits.
P06404US

Root Rot Resistant Snap Bean Cultivars

UW-Madison researchers have developed root rot resistant snap bean cultivars. They crossed and backcrossed a root rot resistant Mexican landrace with commercial cultivars to develop lines that combine root rot resistance with improved pod and plant quality traits.
P06447US

Root Rot Resistant Snap Bean Cultivars

UW-Madison researchers have developed root rot resistant snap bean cultivars. They crossed and backcrossed a root rot resistant Mexican landrace with commercial cultivars to develop lines that combine root rot resistance with improved pod and plant quality traits.
P06448US

Ornamental Corn with Purple and Green Foliage for Landscaping

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a line of ornamental corn with purple and green foliage. This corn may be grown in planters or flower beds.
P07294US

Two Novel Soybean Cyst Nematode and Brown Stem Rot Resistant Soybean Lines

UW-Madison researchers have developed two soybean lines that are resistant to brown stem rot and the soybean cyst nematode. The new lines were developed by crossing several soybean lines, challenging them with disease and then selecting for resistance. Each line is more resistant to the soybean cyst nematode than varieties derived from PI 88788, the most common source of soybean cyst nematode resistance in cultivars adapted to the upper Midwest, and also shows better resistance to brown stem rot than currently available lines.
P07305US

Breeding Population of Corn for Enhanced Silage Production

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new corn population, known as the Wisconsin Quality Synthetic-C4 (WQS C4), with superior milk production potential. Inbred corn lines derived from WQS C4 can be combined with inbred lines derived from the Stiff Stalk Synthetic corn population to provide high yield, high quality hybrids that are adapted to the Northern Corn Belt.
P08445US

Inbred Corn Lines for Developing Silage Hybrids

A team of UW-Madison researchers has developed several inbred lines of corn that are useful for producing silage hybrids. The lines have been tested extensively and detailed yield and compositional data are available.  Line characteristics include superior forage yield potential, high in vitro true digestibility, high in vitro neutral detergent fiber digestibility, high protein and starch content, low neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber content, good stalk quality and/or relatively early maturity.
P090407US01

White, Longneck Variety of Butternut Squash

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new variety of butternut squash having an eye-catching white rind and a longer neck. The cultivar is known as ‘Longneck Buttermilk.’ It was developed through crosses of a yellow rind squash from Puerto Rico and a commercially available strain of Waltham Butternut.
P100124US01

Colorful New Table Beets

UW–Madison researchers have developed novel beet varieties called Badger Torch, Badger Sunset and Badger Flame. They are characterized by alternating red and yellow/orange rings and elongated/cylindrical shapes.

The plants have multigerm seeds, smooth orange skin, small crowns and green leaves with yellow petioles. The three varieties appear similar, but differ in root shape, color and tissue striping.

The new varieties were developed as part of the University of Wisconsin Table Beet Breeding Program. They are open-pollinated.
P110151US01

Corn Breeding Population for New Silage Hybrids

UW–Madison researchers have developed gem quality synthetic cycle 1 (GQS C1) corn that could be used to breed improved inbred lines and silage hybrids. The researchers selected plants displaying high NDFD, high yield and 75 percent Stiff Stalk background.
P110355US01

Inbred Carrot Lines May Resist Root-Knot Pest

UW–Madison researchers have developed inbred carrot lines that exhibit some resistance to Northern root-knot nematode. The two lines are [W261 x (Rotin x W259)] and [W77 x (Rotin x W259)]. The lines were identified via greenhouse screening tests in the presence of nematode infection. Genetic crosses indicated that resistance is conditioned by two different homozygous recessive genes.
P120304US01

W6234-4Rus: A Light Russet Potato with French Fry Potential

UW–Madison researchers have developed W6234-4Rus, a new russet potato variety with characteristics desirable for French fry processing, including much lower acrylamide content, good shape, higher tuber yield and better fry color compared to the industry standard.

The new variety is available through the Wisconsin Crop Improvement Association.
P120381US01

W8405-1R: A Red Skin White Flesh Potato for the Fresh Market

UW–Madison researchers have developed W8405-1R, a red potato variety with very smooth and uniform tubers, round-oval shape, shallow eyes and attractive coloring that maintains well in storage.

The new variety is available through the Wisconsin Crop Improvement Association.
P120384US01

New Inbred Corn Line “W613S” Could Boost Milk Production

UW–Madison researchers have developed an inbred corn line that can be used as a parent of superior silage hybrids. The line, called W613S, exhibits good forage yield and detergent fiber, high in vitro digestibility, and high protein and starch content.
P130025US01

New Inbred Corn Line “W614S” Could Boost Milk Production

UW–Madison researchers have developed an inbred corn line that can be used as a parent of superior silage hybrids. The line, called W614S, exhibits good forage yield and detergent fiber, high in vitro digestibility, and high protein and starch content.
P130026US01

New Inbred Corn Line “W616S” Could Boost Milk Production

UW–Madison researchers have developed an inbred corn line that can be used as a parent of superior silage hybrids. The line, called W616S, exhibits good forage yield and detergent fiber, high in vitro digestibility, and high protein and starch content.
P130028US01

Soybeans Resist Sclerotinia Stem Rot

A UW–Madison researcher and others have created a new line of soybeans that are 100 percent resistant to Sclerotinia stem rot. The line is bred from previously developed, rot-resistant parents.
P130103US02

Teosinte-Crossed Corn Blocks GM Contamination, Preserves Organic Status

The researcher has developed a new teosinte/W22 crossed corn line. The new line shows the best fertility phenotype to date while maintaining cross-incompatibility traits.
P140120US01

W8893-1R: A Round-Oval, Red Skin White Flesh Potato for the Fresh Market

UW–Madison researchers have developed W8893-1R, a red potato variety with very smooth and uniform tubers, round-oval shape, shallow eyes and attractive coloring that maintains well in storage.

The new variety is available through the Wisconsin Crop Improvement Association.
P140163US01

W9133-1Rus: A Russet Potato with Better Disease Resistance and Fresh Market Potential

UW–Madison researchers have developed W9133-1Rus, a good candidate for the table-stock market because it has a smooth tuber type and size, comparable yield to Russet Norkotah and longer storage. The new variety also possess better resistance to common scab, Verticillium wilt and early blight.

The new variety is available through the Wisconsin Crop Improvement Association.
P140166US01

W9433-1Rus: A Russet Potato with Fresh Market and Processing Potential

UW–Madison researchers have developed W9433-1Rus, a russet potato variety suitable for both the table-stock and processing markets. It features higher packable yield than Russet Norkotah and longer storage. The new variety also possesses better fry color than Russet Burbank and foliar disease resistance.

The new variety is available through the Wisconsin Crop Improvement Association.
P140167US01

White Mold & Root Rot Resistant Dark Red Kidney Bean with Good Canning Quality

UW–Madison researchers have developed three kidney bean plant lines that are highly resistant to the bean root rot pathogens Aphanomyces and Pythium and are tolerant to white mold caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. All three lines – 28, 92 and 220-3 – of DRK beans have similar yield and resistance. Growers should be aware that these three lines may have leaf or pod lesions that are the result of a cosmetic genetic mutation.
P160261US01