Technologies

Drug Discovery

Most Recent Inventions

Genetic Testing for Acquired Peripheral Neuropathy in Dogs

UW–Madison researchers have identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that is predictive of APN syndrome in dogs, based on a genome-wide association study. Using a population of Labrador retrievers (56 cases and 26 controls), the researchers have shown that a SNP on CFA1 tags the causal variant for APN in the Labrador retriever breed.
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Research Tool for Protein Conformation Analysis

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method and easy-to-operate device that uses plasma to perform hydroxyl radical footprinting. The device tags the outer surface of the protein and allows the user to study its 3-D conformation via mass spectrometry.

The new technique, which is workable on a benchtop, applicable to a range of protein concentrations and sizes and generates µs bursts of hydroxyl radicals without added chemicals or reagents, has been developed and the results benchmarked. It is useful for quickly performing epitope mapping or assessing protein structural characteristics such as unfolding and conformational changes. The method can be used with two or more distinct proteins to map binding events, which enables pharmaceutical and R&D labs to image proteins in their natural state.

The researchers believe this tool will enable much quicker turnaround (on the order of hours) than X-ray crystallography and more reliable data than Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange (HDX). It can be manufactured alone or in conjunction with mass spectrometry systems.
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Rhinovirus-C Peptide for Development of Vaccines and Antivirals

UW–Madison researchers have identified novel immunogenic peptides from RV-C that are useful targets for therapeutic antibodies.

Recent advances in microscopy enabled the researchers to determine (with atomic resolution) the structure of an RV-C strain, both in its full, infectious form and as native empty particles. The structures highlighted immunogenic surfaces that could be used to design antivirals or vaccines against RV-C.
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Enhanced Drug Delivery Across the Blood-Brain Barrier: pH-Dependent Antibodies Targeting the Transferrin Receptor

UW–Madison researchers have developed several new single-chain antibody fragments to the transferrin receptor which exhibit increased dissociation at pH 5.5. Such targeting antibodies could have immense potential for drug delivery into and across target cells including cancer cells and the BBB.

Unlike other anti-TfR antibodies in development for cancer or brain delivery, the new antibodies have been endowed with pH-sensitivity resulting in differential trafficking and increased intracellular accumulation up to 2.6 times their wild-type parent.
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Enhanced Endotoxin Detection: New Advantages in Liquid Crystal Assays for Gram-Negative Pathogens

UW–Madison researchers have now demonstrated enhanced endotoxin detection in the presence of masking agents in their previous liquid crystal system.

Unlike the LAL assay, the LC-based method does not suffer from LER or any loss of sensitivity due to the presence of cations (e.g., Ca2+ or Mg2+), buffers (e.g., citrate), surfactants (e.g., SDS), chelating agents (e.g., EDTA), proteins or nucleic acids (e.g., DNA or RNA). Thus, the LC-based method provides faster and cheaper detection of endotoxin when compared to existing methods, such as the LAL assay.
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Most Recent Patents

New System for Producing Fungal Secondary Metabolites

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new system for producing fungal secondary metabolites using test plasmids and a genetically modified strain of Aspergillus nidulans (TPMW2.3). The strain begins producing secondary metabolites when a gene promoter in the plasmid is triggered by culture conditions. This allows researchers to induce or repress production.
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New Target for Diagnosing, Treating Neurodegenerative Diseases

UW–Madison researchers have demonstrated that neurofilament tangles lead to subsequent degeneration and death of motor neurons in ALS patients. They also discovered that these tangles are caused by the reduced expression of a type of neurofilament mRNA. Thus, neurofilament regulation appears to be a promising target for drug screening and gene therapy.

The researchers conducted their studies using motor neurons derived from ALS patients.
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New Viral Propagation Method Yields Insight Into Childhood Asthma

UW–Madison researchers have developed an efficient, cost-effective method of propagating RV-C. They discovered that human cadherin-related family member 3 (CDHR3) is the receptor for RV-C and allows cell lines normally unsusceptible to HRV-C infection to support virus binding and replication.

To create cell lines capable of efficiently growing RV-C, the researchers modify the host cell so it expresses an effective amount of the CDHR3 receptor. This method enables high-throughput, large-scale production of RV-C, which in turn enables critical basic and applied research regarding this understudied pathogen.
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