Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,700 technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

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New Inventions

Analogs of Diptoindonesin G for Breast Cancer Drug Development

UW–Madison researchers have synthesized analogs of Dip G that have shown a greater ability than the parent molecule to decrease ERα expression and stabilize ERβ in cultured breast cancer cells. The compounds are active for ameliorating, attenuating and halting the growth/metastasis of breast cancers.
P170010US02

Physics ‘Office Hours’ educational learning platform

A physics education researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay has designed a novel and interactive app-based study aid platform for students in STEM disciplines. The platform’s interface is built around education research into how students conceptualize problems they do not understand. It is a novel tool to help students see why they are struggling with a particular problem, and what might help them solve it, rather than solving the problem for them. The team’s first working prototype, the Physics Office Hours app, has been designed for use in introductory-level college physics. The app is designed to mimic a scenario students might face during ‘office hours’ with a professor: Rather than offering an answer, the instructor guides the students through problems via a series of questions. A user-friendly online interface allows app content to be easily updated and changed over time and as more problem sets become available. In addition, the app architecture can easily be adapted to problem sets in other STEM disciplines and therefore serves as a platform technology.
T150035US01

Efficient In Vitro Assay for Antigen-Specific Tolerance

Building on their work, UW–Madison researchers have now developed a T cell-bound cytokine (T-CBC) assay for detecting and quantifying regulatory T cells specific to self-antigens or donor alloantigens. The new method comprises (a) culturing the subject’s T cells for 24 hours in the presence of one or more target antigens and (b) analyzing the cultured T cells for expression of a marker (EBi3; TGFβ/LAP) indicative of antigen-specific immune suppression.
P160186US02

Genetic Testing for Acquired Peripheral Neuropathy in Dogs

UW–Madison researchers have identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that is predictive of APN syndrome in dogs, based on a genome-wide association study. Using a population of Labrador retrievers (56 cases and 26 controls), the researchers have shown that a SNP on CFA1 tags the causal variant for APN in the Labrador retriever breed.
P160048US02

Novel Transparent Dilatant Materials Comprised of Single Chemical Component

Research from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point has resulted in the synthesis of a series of materials exhibiting a range of dilatant properties. The materials show good transparency and are chemically uniform (e.g. consisting of a single chemical component). The degree of dilatancy is easily controlled by adjusting the compositions of the materials. Due to the range of dilatant properties, good transparency, and single chemical component nature of the dilatant samples, these materials show significant promise for novel uses in protective equipment and other areas related to impact protection, especially where transparency is desirable.
T170056US01
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New Patents

Consumer-Friendly Test for Detecting Very Small Amounts of Bacteria or Other Cells

UW–Madison researchers have developed a novel method for detecting very low levels of bacteria or other cells. In this method, which is suitable for over-the-counter use by consumers, the aggregation of nanoparticles indicates the absence of the target, rather than the presence of the target as in commercially available tests.

The method uses a bifunctional linker. One portion of the linker binds to a target, while a second portion facilitates aggregation of nanoparticles. When the linker is bound to the target, little nanoparticle aggregation occurs. When the target is absent, the linker is available to facilitate aggregation of the nanoparticles. This aggregation can be observed through visual or other means, providing a simple yet sensitive method for detecting pathogenic microorganisms.
P100326US02

Improved Gate Design for Quantum Computers

UW–Madison researchers have developed quantum dots with a novel tunnel barrier gate design. The structure consists of a quantum well layer with three 2DEG regions separated by three tunnel barriers.

An electrode is patterned on a dielectric layer (instead of directly on the dot surface) above the first tunnel barrier. The various electrodes formed on the dielectric layer are arranged to define quantum dot regions within which the energy level and spin of electrons can be manipulated.

The multiple layers of the structure can be made using conventional deposition systems or lithography techniques.
P130184US02

New MIMO Transceiver Cuts Costs, Complexity

UW–Madison researchers have designed a MIMO transceiver for improved interference suppression. The new design eliminates the need for a phase-coherent local oscillator.

More specifically, the new architecture – called differential MIMO or D-MIMO – enables linear interference suppression between multiple spatially multiplexed and differentially encoded data streams. In particular, it is based on a novel approach to quasi-coherent channel measurement from differential measurements that do not require phase coherence between transmitter and receiver. A number of system architectures – with different tradeoffs – are enabled by the invention.
P150112US01
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