Technologies

Materials & Chemicals

Most Recent Inventions

Novel Transparent Dilatant Materials Comprised of Single Chemical Component

Research from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point has resulted in the synthesis of a series of materials exhibiting a range of dilatant properties. The materials show good transparency and are chemically uniform (e.g. consisting of a single chemical component). The degree of dilatancy is easily controlled by adjusting the compositions of the materials. Due to the range of dilatant properties, good transparency, and single chemical component nature of the dilatant samples, these materials show significant promise for novel uses in protective equipment and other areas related to impact protection, especially where transparency is desirable.
T170056WO01

Perovskites for Stable, High Activity Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes and Related Technologies

Using high-throughput computing and informatics to screen thousands of candidates, UW–Madison researchers have identified doped perovskite compounds that exhibit both high catalytic activity and thermodynamic stability under ORR operating conditions. These improvements are believed to enable lower-temperature operation of SOFCs and improve device lifetime.

In total, approximately 1950 distinct perovskite compositions were simulated. The most active predicted compounds were found to contain alloys of transition metals and redox-inactive dopant elements (ex., Zr, Hf, Nb, Re and Ta) that can enhance stability.
P160222US01

Nylon-3 Polymers Active Against Clostridium Difficile

UW–Madison researchers and collaborators at Emory Medical School have developed nylon-3 polymers and copolymers active against C. difficile. The polymers have been shown to inhibit outgrowth/growth of the bacteria in spore and vegetative form.
P150214US02

Slippery Antifouling Surfaces with Health, Environmental and Consumer Applications

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new approach for fabricating and functionalizing SLIPS on objects of arbitrary shape, size and topology (e.g., inside a hollow tube, etc.). The new SLIPS have greater control over how fluids behave when they come in contact. For example, they can be designed with oil-free regions to immobilize fluid droplets and/or control how they slide across the surface.

The new SLIPS are antifouling to bacteria, fungi and mammalian cells, and may be used for the controlled release of antibiotics and to prevent thick liquids or dirt from building up on a surface. They are fabricated via the infusion of oils into reactive polymer multilayers.
P150342US02

Most Recent Patents

Organic Polymers with Ultra-Small Pores for Carbon Dioxide Separation, Capture, and Conversion

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin – Platteville have synthesized an array of chemically and thermally stable organic polymers comprised of ultra-small pores capable of separating out and capturing carbon dioxide molecules from a mixture of gases. These include phenazine linked polymers (PLPs), glyoxal‐derived polymers (GDPs), benzoxazole‐linked polymers (BOLPs), and benzothiazole‐linked polymers (BTLPs) with each having nitrogen-rich functionality to attract CO2. The single component adsorption isotherms demonstrated that the polymers have exceptionally high CO2 capture ability over CH4 and N2 with maximum adsorption selectivity of 35 times greater and 140 times greater, respectively, at 25°C. Such polymers have utility in the formation of membrane composites for use in membrane gas separation technology. Additionally, the researchers have been able to combine these polymers with silver metal resulting in the catalytic conversion of carbon dioxide molecules to useful chemical compounds.
T160005US02

Dense Polymer Brush Growth with New Copolymer

UW–Madison researchers have developed a novel crosslinkable random copolymer and film. The film can be used as a grafting substrate to grow polymer brushes via SI-ATRP.

The copolymers are synthesized by standard techniques. They consist of a styrene or acrylate-based inimer for initiating ATRP and a monomer for crosslinking. Once the copolymers have been formed, they can be crosslinked into films by applying heat and/or light. This step can be carried out on different surfaces using spin-coating methods.

After the crosslinked films have been prepared, they can be used as grafting substrates for SI-ATRP growth of polymer and copolymer brushes. During SI-ATRP, a reaction generates a polymer brush composed of multiple polymer chains attached to the film.
P130169US02

Perovskites as Ultralow Work Function Cathode Materials

Using high-throughput computing and informatics to screen thousands of candidates, UW–Madison researchers have identified a perovskite oxide, SrVO3, with a lower predicted work function than current state-of-the-art cathodes.

SrVO3 exhibited one of the lowest calculated work functions (1.86 eV) out of 18 perovskite materials investigated (~ 40 compositionally distinct surfaces). Non-volatile barium doping was used to further lower the work function (1.07 eV) and was more stable than on tungsten or scandium surfaces, indicating that Ba will reside on SrVO3 orders of magnitude longer than on other widely explored thermionic cathode material surfaces.
P160033US02