Technologies

Medical Devices

Most Recent Inventions

A Low-Cost, Dosimeter Accessory Kit Enabling the Collection of Accurate Sound Level Measurements from within the Ear Canal

Researchers from the University of Wisconsin – Whitewater in partnership with the Center for Device Design and Development at UW-Fox Valley, have developed a set of low-cost, dosimeter attachments that allow for sound levels to be measured in the ear canal. By combining these novel attachments with commercially available dosimeters, a more accurate reading can be obtained that reflects the true exposure level of potentially harmful noise to the individual. With the current accessory kit, one of three attachments comfortably fits in the user’s ear and connects to a standard dosimeter. Field tests have demonstrated that higher sound levels were recorded at the level of the ear canal using these attachments compared with the traditional method using a shoulder mounted dosimeter.
T150024US02

Improved System for Stroke Therapy and Rehabilitation

UW-Madison researchers have developed an improved system for stroke therapy and rehabilitation.  This system collects movement intention signals from the brain in real-time via EEG and initiates functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the appropriate muscle(s) to assist the neurons in regrowing their connections from the brain to the muscles along the correct pathways.  Additional general sensory stimulation may be added to this therapy to further encourage proper neuron regrowth. 
P09245US02

Growth Factor Regulation in Blood Products for Improved Wound Healing

UW–Madison researchers have developed hydrogel microspheres for sequestering problematic growth factors, specifically VEGF, in patient-derived blood products. The degradable microspheres are functionalized with peptide ligands that selectively bind and remove unwanted VEGF from platelet rich plasma and other blood products before they are used in clinical procedures.
P160179US01

Perivascular Drug Delivery System Inhibits Restenosis

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new device and method for perivascular delivery of drugs to treat and prevent restenosis.

The device consists of a sheath made from a bioresorbable polymer. An anti-proliferative drug is loaded into the sheath. When the sheath is placed around the outside of the blood vessel, the drug is delivered to the vessel over time.
P150048US02

Most Recent Patents

More Stable Collagen Mimetic Peptides for Wound Healing

UW–Madison researchers have developed a superior linkage between CMP strands that substantially improves their structural stability. The new linkage uses homocysteine in place of cysteine in one of the strands. The resulting bond reduces strain and can therefore be used to enhance CMP-based biomaterials and enable previously inaccessible molecular designs.
P140407US02

Microtube Scaffold for Sensing and Stimulating Nerve Cell Connections

UW-Madison researchers have developed a method to produce a scaffold system for neurons that permits guided growth or interconnection of neurons and sensing or stimulation of neural activity. The method involves growing nerve cells through doped semiconductor microtubes that act as tunable electrodes for sensing and stimulating nerve cell connections. The tubes allow the growth and interconnection of the neurons to be controlled, and sensors and/or stimulating probes incorporated along the length of the tubes can be used to provide precisely located but spatially separated measurements and stimulation.

The tubes are made of semiconducting thin-film nanomembranes, may vary in length and have diameters ranging from one to 100 microns. Cells are placed near the opening of the tube and preferentially grow through the tube. The microtubes form a coaxial probe around the nerve cell growth, effectively coupling an electrode to the neurons. The tube also acts to protect the neuron from a culture solution that may produce ion leakage, affecting signal propagation and introducing signal noise.
P100158US01

Tactile Button Panel for Use with Touch Screens

UW–Madison researchers have developed a touch screen system that attaches a simple button fixture over a portion of the screen. This is important because virtual ‘buttons’ may be difficult to see or manipulate.

The buttons have clear markings that can be felt by a user. When pressed, the buttons contact the touch screen and the task is performed as usual. The button panel may be mounted permanently or fastened.
P110167US01