Technologies

Medical Devices

Most Recent Inventions

Algorithms to Classify T Cell Activation by Autofluorescence Imaging

Building on award-winning work, UW–Madison researchers have discovered that autofluorescence intensity images of NAD(P)H can accurately classify T cells as activated or not activated (‘naïve’ or ‘quiescent’), and have developed algorithms to classify T cell activation based on the images. Specifically, adapting pre-trained convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for the T cell activity classification task, T cells can be classified with 92 percent accuracy. These pre-trained CNNs perform better than classification based on summary statistics (e.g., cell size) or CNNs trained on the autofluorescence images alone.

This invention provides a way to non-invasively detect T cell activation by imaging NAD(P)H intensity. These algorithms can be applied to NAD(P)H images taken with commercial imaging flow cytometers / sorters, and fluorescence microscopes. If increased accuracy of T cell activation is needed for a specific application, additional measurements of the other NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence endpoints can be obtained and used for classification.
P190306US02

Method and Device to Screen and Sort Cancer Immunotherapy Cells

UW–Madison researchers have developed a highly accurate label-free method to non-invasively detect T cell activation by detection of free-NAD(P)H fraction, NAD(P)H α1. NAD(P)H α1 can be measured by fluorescence lifetime imaging or spectroscopy systems. The device could also sort T cells based on NAD(P)H α1. If increased accuracy of T cell activation is needed for a specific application, additional measurements of the other NAD(P)H and FAD autofluorescence endpoints can be obtained and used for classification.
P180292US02

Methods for Detection, Staging and Surveillance of Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

UW–Madison researchers have identified a panel of protein biomarkers that can be used to noninvasively “stage” cancer (including lymph node status), identify high-risk precancerous polyps, and longitudinally monitor polyp presence before and after polypectomy. These protein markers reliably distinguish between stage 1, 2 and 3 cancers, as well as low- and high-risk adenomas. Further, select biomarkers revert toward normal levels with the disappearance of such adenomas, suggesting that these markers can be used to monitor for tumor resurgence and long-term care. Overall, this diagnostic advancement should improve colorectal cancer detection, patient treatment and outcomes while also reducing the associated costs.
P160352US02

Digital Otoscope for Optimal Access, Visualization

UW–Madison researchers have designed an otoscope featuring a small camera that is mounted on a narrow tip and able to ‘look around’ obstructions such as earwax. The narrow tip also permits other medical instruments to be inserted into the ear while the otoscope is being used (e.g., a curette for removing earwax or foreign objects). A remarkable view of the tympanic membrane is achieved, facilitating proper diagnosis.

Notable features include a disposable, light-conducting speculum sleeve with distal tip smaller than 2 mm. In addition, images may be captured directly from the device and stored in the patient record in compliance with Federal law.
P150259US01

Most Recent Patents

Minimally Invasive Microwave Ablation Antennas

UW–Madison researchers have developed two minimally invasive, balun-free antenna designs that are small enough to treat cancers otherwise out of the reach of microwave ablation.

The first design can take any base-fed monopole, spiral or bent wire configuration. Alternatively, the antenna can use a structure more suitable for higher frequencies (five GHz to 30 GHz). This design uses cable shielding over a balanced two-wire transmission line. The design protects surrounding tissue and eliminates the need for baluns.
P140132US01

Improved System for Stroke Therapy and Rehabilitation

UW-Madison researchers have developed an improved system for stroke therapy and rehabilitation.  This system collects movement intention signals from the brain in real-time via EEG and initiates functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the appropriate muscle(s) to assist the neurons in regrowing their connections from the brain to the muscles along the correct pathways.  Additional general sensory stimulation may be added to this therapy to further encourage proper neuron regrowth. 
P09245US02

‘Smart’ Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt

UW–Madison neurological surgeons and their collaborators have developed a ‘smart’ shunt that is self-regulating and overcomes the issue of over-drainage associated with all commercially available systems.

The new system features continuous intracranial pressure sensing and a novel valve design actuated by a piezoelectric lever. An external wireless transmitter (e.g., RFID device) connected to a computer enables physicians to control the shunt, to set parameters or thresholds for the valve.

By monitoring intracranial pressure and continuously alternating between opened/closed valve position, the system prevents fluid from constantly draining. This allows the surrounding tissue to rebound from the catheter holes, allows the brain to retain its normal shape, and mitigates blockage concerns.
P170214US01