Technologies

New Patents

Dense Polymer Brush Growth with New Copolymer

UW–Madison researchers have developed a novel crosslinkable random copolymer and film. The film can be used as a grafting substrate to grow polymer brushes via SI-ATRP.

The copolymers are synthesized by standard techniques. They consist of a styrene or acrylate-based inimer for initiating ATRP and a monomer for crosslinking. Once the copolymers have been formed, they can be crosslinked into films by applying heat and/or light. This step can be carried out on different surfaces using spin-coating methods.

After the crosslinked films have been prepared, they can be used as grafting substrates for SI-ATRP growth of polymer and copolymer brushes. During SI-ATRP, a reaction generates a polymer brush composed of multiple polymer chains attached to the film.
(Oct 23, 2018) P130169US02

Increasing Memory Bandwidth

UW–Madison researchers have developed a system to substantially increase memory bus bandwidth by combining a parallel memory bus with a high-speed serial memory bus. A serial memory bus normally introduces too much latency (data delay) for general computer processors, but this can be accommodated using special processors like GPUs or streaming processors.

By selectively steering some memory traffic to the serial memory bus, total memory bandwidth is significantly increased while still providing low latency when needed via the parallel memory bus.
(Oct 23, 2018) P140155US01

Optimized Nanoresonator Design Signals Breakthroughs in Spectrometry and Device Efficiency

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new method and structure for increasing the cross section of nanoresonators, thereby improving the concentration ratio of light (or other electromagnetic radiation) and device performance. The key to their approach is that the nanoresonator is surrounded by a material that provides increased light concentration.
(Oct 23, 2018) P160052US01

Kit Predicts Twinning in Cattle

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a genetic test to determine the likelihood a cow or a bull’s female progeny will produce twin offspring. The test is based on the presence or absence of the ‘trio’ haplotype, which is a set of three genetic markers on bovine chromosome 10 (BTA10). In combination, these markers suggest a cow or bull has a higher propensity for twinning.
(Oct 16, 2018) P130303US02

Ultrawideband, Frequency-Selective Transceiver Lens for Less Distortion

UW–Madison researchers have developed a microwave lens for ultrawideband signals that doesn’t introduce major distortion in the radiated pulse.

The design utilizes low-pass FSS layers of metallic grids. The grids are formed by inductive-capacitive (IC) cells that resonate in response to incoming electromagnetic radiation at frequencies that vary with cell shape. The two-dimensional grids are mounted on both sides of stacked dielectric sheets in alignment with each other to form a time-delay circuit, or filter.

To receive and transmit a pulse, a processor first receives a digital data stream and transforms it into an analog signal. An electromagnetic wave feed element, like a dipole antenna, receives the signal and radiates a spherical radio wave toward the first capacitive grid. The time-delay circuit is selected to reradiate the wave in the form of a second radio wave. Consistent time delays across the desired band and calculated phase shifts ensure that the incident wave is not distorted.
(Oct 2, 2018) P120192US01

New and More Potent UGM Inhibitors for Treating Tuberculosis, Other Microbial Infections

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new set of UGM inhibitors to fight tuberculosis and other diseases caused by microbial infections. The compounds feature an N-acylsulfonamide motif and are more potent in vitro than inhibitors previously identified by the researchers.
(Sep 25, 2018) P160093US02

New System for Producing Fungal Secondary Metabolites

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new system for producing fungal secondary metabolites using test plasmids and a genetically modified strain of Aspergillus nidulans (TPMW2.3). The strain begins producing secondary metabolites when a gene promoter in the plasmid is triggered by culture conditions. This allows researchers to induce or repress production.
(Sep 18, 2018) P150029US02

Single-Crystal Halide Perovskite Nanowires with Superior Performance

Metal halide perovskite-based material is emerging as a “superstar” semiconductor material for cost-effective photovoltaic applications. UW–Madison researchers have developed a practical solution growth method for producing single-crystal perovskite nanowires with superior material quality and lasing performance.

Specifically the new method is based on a facile process of low-temperature dissolution of a metal precursor film in a cation precursor solution, followed by recrystallization to form single-crystal perovskite nanostructures such as nanowires, nanorods and nanoplates. Diverse families of metal halide perovskite materials with different cations, anions and dimensionality with different properties can be made to enable high-performance device applications.
(Sep 18, 2018) P160053US01

Perovskites as Ultralow Work Function Cathode Materials

Using high-throughput computing and informatics to screen thousands of candidates, UW–Madison researchers have identified a perovskite oxide, SrVO3, with a lower predicted work function than current state-of-the-art cathodes.

SrVO3 exhibited one of the lowest calculated work functions (1.86 eV) out of 18 perovskite materials investigated (~ 40 compositionally distinct surfaces). Non-volatile barium doping was used to further lower the work function (1.07 eV) and was more stable than on tungsten or scandium surfaces, indicating that Ba will reside on SrVO3 orders of magnitude longer than on other widely explored thermionic cathode material surfaces.
(Sep 11, 2018) P160033US02

Controlling the Formation of Stem Cell Colonies with Tailored SAM Array

Building on their previous work, the researchers have developed a new feature to make SAM arrays an even better tool to control cell aggregation. Specifically, the spots on the array consist of cellular adhesive peptides stuck to the surface by an easy-to-cleave labile bond. The peptides enable layers of cell to form and detach from the array without scraping or other external manipulation.

Any peptide capable of forming such a bond (e.g., a thioester bond) with the SAM surface could be employed.
(Sep 4, 2018) P150062US01