Technologies

New Patents

Improved Manufacture of Porous Materials for Catalysis and More

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a new method for manufacturing porous metal-oxygen based materials. The method achieves structures with controlled porosity and shape based on air oxidation.

In brief, the materials are produced from metal alloys via an oxidative dealloying process that selectively removes one or more elements from the alloy and converts remaining elements into a stable metal-oxygen matrix having a controlled porosity. Once fabricated, the porous matrices are post-treated to render them suitable for various downstream applications.
(Aug 20, 2019) P160073US01

Engineered Probiotics as Systemic Therapeutic Delivery Platform

UW–Madison researchers have developed bacteria engineered to systemically deliver a therapeutic polypeptide into a subject without the bacteria being substantially introduced into the bloodstream. This platform could be used to non-invasively increase systemic levels of hormones, peptides and potentially single-chain antibodies.

Using this new approach, the researchers engineered a lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus reuteri, to systemically deliver interleukin-22 (IL-22) in mice. The method is not limited to IL-22; other potential polypeptides include IL-35, insulin, leptin, a peptide inhibitor of PCSK9 and endolysin.
(Aug 13, 2019) P160109US02

Inhibiting Metadherin/SND1 Interaction to Treat Cancer

UW–Madison researchers and collaborators have developed a method to fight tumor growth and metastasis using novel peptides that inhibit interaction between MTDH and a protein called SND1.

The researchers found that MTDH-SND1 protein interaction is important for the expansion and function of prostate tumors as well as luminal and basal breast tumor initiating cells. Their work provides novel peptides that target this protein complex to help control tumor initiation, recurrence and metastasis by combating tumor initiating cells, with minimal impact on normal tissues.
(Jul 23, 2019) P140424US02

Superabsorbent, Sustainable Aerogels

UW–Madison researchers have developed organic aerogels with excellent absorbent properties. They are made by combining a water soluble polymer and cellulose nanocrystals/nanofibers (CNFs) derived from biomass. The polymer, such as PVA (polyvinyl alcohol), is cross-linked to form a gel and then water is removed by freeze-drying. The surface of the aerogel is coated with an organosilane, making it highly water repellent and superoleophilic (‘oil loving’).
(Jul 16, 2019) P140038US02

New Isogeometric Analysis Software for Seamless Integration of Design and Analysis

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new method for creating a CAD-compatible mesh during an isogeometric analysis process. Unlike existing techniques, the method creates meshes without any approximation and delivers optimal convergence rates.

In essence, the researchers have developed a smoothing step that prevents inconsistencies from being introduced into the meshing process as a geometric map of the object is being refined.
(Jul 9, 2019) P150209US01

Rapid MRI Gradient Calibration Using Single-Point Imaging

UW–Madison researchers have developed a dynamic SPI-based method for MRI systems that allows simple, rapid and robust measurement of k-space trajectory.

To enable gradient measurement, they utilized the variable field-of-view (FOV) property of dynamic SPI, which is dependent on gradient shape. In the process, one-dimensional (1-D) dynamic SPI data are acquired from a targeted gradient axis, and then relative FOV scaling factors between 1-D images or k-spaces at varying encoding times are found. These relative scaling factors are the relative k-space position that can be used for image reconstruction.

The gradient measurement technique also can be used to estimate the gradient impulse response function for reproducible gradient estimation as a linear time invariant system.
(Jul 2, 2019) P160026US01

Generating Medical Isotopes with Safer Vessel and Materials

Wisconsin researchers have developed a ring-shaped, or annular, fissile solution vessel for generating medical isotopes.

The assembly holds three nested chambers. Ions are first directed into an internal target chamber containing a gas. The neutrons that are generated pass outward, through a cooling jacket, into the surrounding fissile solution vessel. This vessel contains an aqueous composition of nuclear material and is shaped to increase heat transfer area to volume. Neutrons strike the nuclear material, generating isotopes and additional neutrons. The solution vessel is separated by another cooling jacket from an outer chamber that reflects neutrons.
(Jun 25, 2019) P120047US01

Compound Combination Targets Bacterial Virulence

The researchers have discovered that two lead compounds (E22/M64) can be combined to target multiple QS pathways at the same time (Rhl/Pqs), resulting in enhanced activity against P. aeruginosa and potentially other pathogens. This new cocktail approach is superior because it attenuates virulence factor production across a range of relevant environments where single compounds fail.
(Jun 18, 2019) P160176US02

A Novel Series of Antimicrobials Target Bacteria Membranes to Overcome Antibiotic Resistance

UW–Madison researchers have developed a novel series of antimicrobial compounds that target the membranes of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and are effective both against actively growing and stationary bacteria.

The series of compounds are analogs and derivatives of DCAP, or (2-((3-(3,6-dichloro-9H-carbazol-9-yl)-2-hydroxypropyl)amino)-2-(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol).

This series of compounds disrupts the bacterial cell envelope and causes cell death, and has only minor effects on eukaryotic cells. With this discovery, new antimicrobials based on DCAP analogs and derivatives could be used to combat resistant bacterial cells.
(Jun 11, 2019) P120204US02

Smoother Surfaces with Pulsed Laser Polishing

UW–Madison researchers have developed a two-regime method to reduce rough surface features using a multiple-pass PLP approach.

In the first regime, melt pools are created on the surface using energy pulses, which generate higher temperatures where the beam is focused. Thermocapillary flow pulls down asperities into the melt pools. This can cause material to push up at the edge of the pools as they resolidify. A second regime applies different energy pulses to remove and/or rearrange the upwelled material.
(Jun 11, 2019) P130168US01