Technologies

New Patents

Tailored Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry for 4-D Treatment Planning System

UW-Madison researchers have developed a system for precisely tailoring the quantity and timing of the administration of a radiopharmaceutical to a particular patient. To generate time-activity curves, an imaging radioisotope is first administered and the subject is scanned using dynamic PET/CT imaging. From the acquired datasets, the critical organ, which displays toxicity at the lowest injection level, is determined. A fractionation scheme is then developed for tumor control and toxicity avoidance, and precise, patient-specific administration schedules are created based on the effect that varying dose rates have on the critical organs and tumors. This two-step technique can provide sufficient precision to allow the combination of radiopharmaceutical treatment with other radiation treatment such as external-beam radiotherapy.
(Jun 26, 2018) P09003US

Modified Yeast with Enhanced Tolerance for GVL Biomass Solvent

UW–Madison researchers have developed a genetically modified strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is more resistant to GVL toxicity and grows more than 1.5 times faster than wild yeast in the presence of GVL.

The researchers deleted two genes (Pad1p and Fdc1p) in the yeast that play a role in mediating GVL tolerance. The new strain is the first ethanol-producing yeast specifically tailored for GVL-based techniques.
(Jun 26, 2018) P140430US02

New Rotor Magnet Configuration Delivers Greater Efficiency at a Lower Price

UW–Madison researchers have developed a streamlined sinusoidal rotor magnet design for interior permanent magnet machines.

By altering the classic rectangular block design for embedded magnet stacks in favor of a sinusoidal, axially varied orientation, researchers have increased the efficiency of rotors in IPMMs in a twofold fashion: Not only does this new design reduce the amount of magnet material necessary for rotor production, but it also provides an optimized distribution of flux that significantly reduces torque pulsation and spatial harmonics. The new design is easy to manufacture and is complementary to rotors already in existence.
(Jun 19, 2018) P150363US01

Vaccine for Fungal Infections

UW–Madison researchers have developed a vaccine that could prevent infection by many strains of pathogenic fungi.

The vaccine contains calnexin, a common folding protein found in fungi and other eukaryotes. Administered in an effective amount, the vaccine helps a patient’s immune system recognize and destroy fungus it may encounter.
(Jun 12, 2018) P130116US02

More Stable Collagen Mimetic Peptides for Wound Healing

UW–Madison researchers have developed a superior linkage between CMP strands that substantially improves their structural stability. The new linkage uses homocysteine in place of cysteine in one of the strands. The resulting bond reduces strain and can therefore be used to enhance CMP-based biomaterials and enable previously inaccessible molecular designs.
(Jun 5, 2018) P140407US02

Faster, Distortion-Free MRI Near Metallic Implants

Improving upon their earlier work, UW–Madison researchers have developed a method to accelerate MRI scans performed near metal. The new method can work with existing techniques such as MAVRIC.

The new method efficiently measures coil sensitivities across a broad off-resonance spectrum, enabling the use of externally calibrated PMRI techniques. The method saves significant time by eliminating the need to obtain fully sampled calibration regions for all of the acquisitions at different resonance frequency offsets.
(Jun 5, 2018) P150006US01

3-D Printer for High Quality, Large-Scale Metal Parts

UW–Madison researchers have developed a linear multisource 3-D printer capable of producing large, fully dense metal parts with micron resolution.

The highly practical design employs a mechanically scanned cathode comb, large metal powder bed and vacuum. The design ensures a tightly controlled focal spot size, minimizes the number of beam sources, produces large parts at full density and requires little or no post processing because of the high resolution print head.
(May 29, 2018) P150236US01

Microtube Scaffold for Sensing and Stimulating Nerve Cell Connections

UW-Madison researchers have developed a method to produce a scaffold system for neurons that permits guided growth or interconnection of neurons and sensing or stimulation of neural activity. The method involves growing nerve cells through doped semiconductor microtubes that act as tunable electrodes for sensing and stimulating nerve cell connections. The tubes allow the growth and interconnection of the neurons to be controlled, and sensors and/or stimulating probes incorporated along the length of the tubes can be used to provide precisely located but spatially separated measurements and stimulation.

The tubes are made of semiconducting thin-film nanomembranes, may vary in length and have diameters ranging from one to 100 microns. Cells are placed near the opening of the tube and preferentially grow through the tube. The microtubes form a coaxial probe around the nerve cell growth, effectively coupling an electrode to the neurons. The tube also acts to protect the neuron from a culture solution that may produce ion leakage, affecting signal propagation and introducing signal noise.
(May 22, 2018) P100158US01

Treating Iron Overload with Block Copolymers

UW–Madison researchers have developed new block copolymers for forming micelles that can respond to the oxidation state of their environment and chelate iron (II) and (III) ions. At suitable concentrations the copolymers can form micelles to prolong circulation in the blood and bind to non-transferrin bound iron. The micelles then break up in cells in the presence of oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide and are cleared from the body by the liver or kidney route.

The copolymers include a polyhydroxamic acid-containing block and a polyferrocenyl block. They can be prepared by standard peptide synthesis or polymerization methods.
(May 15, 2018) P140395US02

Synthesizing Natural Products to Treat High Blood Cholesterol

UW–Madison researchers have developed an efficient method to synthesize indole compounds, specifically polysubstituted dimeric indoles. These compounds have potential health benefits because they are able to reduce the amount of PCSK9 in cells. PCSK9 is an enzyme known to play a major role in controlling the concentration of LDL cholesterol in the bloodstream.

Some of the compounds have been tested in vitro for their ability to increase the secretion of a potent blood sugar hormone in the body called glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Others have the ability to selectively inhibit the secretion of interleukin-17 (IL-17), which is essential in many autoimmune diseases including arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease.

The synthesis process involves a cascade reaction with transition metal catalysts. The resulting compounds can be further functionalized to yield more substituted indoles.
(May 15, 2018) P150023US03