Technologies

New Patents

Modified Newton’s Cradle Demonstrating Mechanical Impedance

A Physics professor and inventor at the University of Wisconsin – Whitewater has developed a modified Newton’s Cradle that allows the user to visualize and test the concept of mechanical impedance in addition to momentum and energy conservation. The traditional version of Newton’s cradle has a cradle of identical metal spheres. In this modified and improved device, the user is able to interchange these spheres with ones of varying mass and material composition. By allowing the user to strategically align and create a unique cradle, they have the opportunity to visualize mechanical impedance. For example, a sphere with a small mass would have the ability to strike the cradle and lift a sphere of greater mass on the opposite side if the spheres in-between had a gradient of increasing mass themselves. The possibility of changing a sphere at any position in the cradle allows for an exceptionally large number of possible experiments and would overall lead to an enhanced understanding of the aforementioned physics concepts, something a traditional cradle device does not provide for.
(Oct 6, 2020) T170047US02

Treating Multiple Sclerosis with UV Light

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method for suppressing MS symptoms by irradiating a patient with a narrow band of ultraviolet (UV) light. The light has a wavelength between about 300-315 nm. Patients could be irradiated using commercially available lamps or blankets. A typical treatment regimen could be 10-30 minutes of exposure for several days.
(Sep 22, 2020) P120376US02

Wound Field Synchronous Machines with Enhanced Saliency, Performance

UW–Madison researchers have designed a modified rotor structure for salient pole WFSMs that enhances saliency and leads to better performance (peak motoring power/torque capability) using the same amount of input current.

Compared to conventional designs, the new rotor structure features a flux barrier gap made of a low cost polymer that enlarges the reactance Xd - Xq, differential between rotor axes. Based on the particular end use, three different barrier designs could be employed (single barrier, multilayer barrier or axial laminated).
(Sep 22, 2020) P170015US01

High Yield Method to Produce HMF from Fructose

UW–Madison researchers have discovered that a solvent system comprising water and a polar aprotic solvent (e.g., acetone) is ideally suited for converting C6 carbohydrates into HMF at reasonably low temperatures (such as 120°C), low acid concentration and at very high yields and efficiencies.

The C6 carbohydrate used in the method can be derived from any source including biomass (processed or unprocessed), cellulose and lignocellulosic sources, etc. The nature of the C6 carbohydrate is not critical to the method, although fructose is preferred.
(Sep 22, 2020) P180329US01

Improved Methods for Producing Low-Cost Protein-Polysaccharide Conjugates for Use in Foods and Beverages

UW–Madison researchers have developed novel methods of producing protein-polysaccharide complexes using a wet heat treatment.  The process involves heating aqueous solutions containing protein in the presence of a polysaccharide with a reducing sugar.  High concentrations of a stabilizing polysaccharide, such as dextran, are used to prevent unwanted protein denaturation. The resulting PPCs exhibit improved thermal stability, more desirable color and excellent emulsifying properties.  They are superior to both unmodified protein and gum Arabic.
(Sep 8, 2020) P08190US

Minimally Invasive Microwave Ablation Antennas

UW–Madison researchers have developed two minimally invasive, balun-free antenna designs that are small enough to treat cancers otherwise out of the reach of microwave ablation.

The first design can take any base-fed monopole, spiral or bent wire configuration. Alternatively, the antenna can use a structure more suitable for higher frequencies (five GHz to 30 GHz). This design uses cable shielding over a balanced two-wire transmission line. The design protects surrounding tissue and eliminates the need for baluns.
(Sep 8, 2020) P140132US01

Lipid-Free, Stabilized Emulsions for Delivering Anesthesia and Other Hydrophobic Drugs

UW–Madison researchers have developed non-lipid nanoemulsions for delivering propofol and other hydrophobic compounds. The formulations contain miniscule droplets of semifluorinated block copolymers and perhalogenated fluorous compounds, such as perfluorooctyl bromide or perfluorodecalin.

These ingredients are capable of forming a stable nanoemulsion without the need for conventional lipid components (e.g., soybean oil) that support bacterial and/or fungal growth. The emulsions have enhanced stability with respect to droplet size due to decreased particle coarsening, coagulation and/or phase separation.
(Sep 1, 2020) P140337US02

Designing Programmable Inducible Promoters for Biosensor Applications

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method for de novo design of synthetic inducible promoters for transcription factors and other DNA binding proteins such as aTFs with tunable dynamic range behavior and compatibility with virtually any host organism.

The method can include selecting inducible promoters, for example, by converting a constitutive promoter of an organism into an inducible promoter by introducing binding sites near the RNA polymerase binding site. By controlling the access of a transcription factor and the RNA polymerase to the promoter, the dynamic range of the system can be controlled.
(Aug 18, 2020) P170081US02

Recyclable Catalyst for Lower Cost Production of Fermentable Sugars and High Value Chemicals from Biomass

An assistant professor in chemical engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and former senior research scientist at the Montana State University Bio-Energy Center have developed a technology that reduces the processing cost and time to fractionate lignocellulose into fermentable sugars. The technology is centered on the use of a catalyst linked to a magnetic bead, which replaces the need for acids and enzymes in the pretreatment step of the production process. Because of its magnetic properties, the catalyst can easily be recovered from the reaction mixture and reused multiple times. It is also capable of functioning under cellulose loads as high as 50%, whereas loads for competing solid acid catalysts have been typically limited to less than 15%. The end result is a process that makes better use of carbon-neutral biomass by lowering production costs and increasing yield of desirable monomer sugars and high value chemical compounds such as vanillin, phenol, acetophenone.
(Aug 11, 2020) T170034US02

Genetic Testing for Acquired Peripheral Neuropathy in Dogs

UW–Madison researchers have identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that is predictive of APN syndrome in dogs, based on a genome-wide association study. Using a population of Labrador retrievers (56 cases and 26 controls), the researchers have shown that a SNP on CFA1 tags the causal variant for APN in the Labrador retriever breed.
(Jul 28, 2020) P160048US02