Technologies

Pharmaceuticals & Vitamin D

Most Recent Inventions

Nylon-3 Polymers to Treat Fungal Infections

UW–Madison researchers have found that nylon-3 polymers developed in their lab display potent antifungal activity against a broad spectrum of common fungal pathogens, with minimal toxicity towards mammalian cells. The polymers have some activity alone, and when used in combination with existing drugs provide synergistic effects against Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus strains, including some resistant strains.

Synergistic combination offers efficacy with significantly reduced amounts of drug and corresponding toxicity, which could potentially expand the relevant patient population.

The polymers were designed to resemble host-defense peptides (HDPs), which are natural molecules that exhibit antimicrobial activities.
P170021US02

Analogs of Diptoindonesin G for Breast Cancer Drug Development

UW–Madison researchers have synthesized analogs of Dip G that have shown a greater ability than the parent molecule to decrease ERα expression and stabilize ERβ in cultured breast cancer cells. The compounds are active for ameliorating, attenuating and halting the growth/metastasis of breast cancers.
P170010US02

Use of Salate Derivatives to Treat Multiple Sclerosis

UW–Madison researchers led by Prof. Hector DeLuca have discovered that two specific salate esters commonly found in sunscreen almost completely prevented experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) development in mice without affecting body weight. Salicylates are well-known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); the complete suppression of EAE by topical administration of homosalate and octyl salicylate is a novel finding.
P160384US02

Efficient In Vitro Assay for Antigen-Specific Tolerance

Building on their work, UW–Madison researchers have now developed a T cell-bound cytokine (T-CBC) assay for detecting and quantifying regulatory T cells specific to self-antigens or donor alloantigens. The new method comprises (a) culturing the subject’s T cells for 24 hours in the presence of one or more target antigens and (b) analyzing the cultured T cells for expression of a marker (EBi3; TGFβ/LAP) indicative of antigen-specific immune suppression.
P160186US02

Method and Compounds for Treating Friedreich’s Ataxia

UW–Madison researchers have developed a chimeric synthetic molecule capable of inducing increases in FXN mRNA levels in Friedreich’s ataxia patient cell lines.

The complex has the formula A-L-B wherein A- is a bromodomain inhibitor, -L- is a linker, and -B is a polyamide that specifically binds to one or more repeats of a GAA oligonucleotide sequence. Mechanistically, when the complex binds to the repeat sequence, the bromodomain inhibitor (ex., Brd4) recruits the superelongation complex (SEC) to restart the paused transcription complex.
P160232US05

Most Recent Patents

Vaccine for Fungal Infections

UW–Madison researchers have developed a vaccine that could prevent infection by many strains of pathogenic fungi.

The vaccine contains calnexin, a common folding protein found in fungi and other eukaryotes. Administered in an effective amount, the vaccine helps a patient’s immune system recognize and destroy fungus it may encounter.
P130116US02

More Stable Collagen Mimetic Peptides for Wound Healing

UW–Madison researchers have developed a superior linkage between CMP strands that substantially improves their structural stability. The new linkage uses homocysteine in place of cysteine in one of the strands. The resulting bond reduces strain and can therefore be used to enhance CMP-based biomaterials and enable previously inaccessible molecular designs.
P140407US02

Treating Iron Overload with Block Copolymers

UW–Madison researchers have developed new block copolymers for forming micelles that can respond to the oxidation state of their environment and chelate iron (II) and (III) ions. At suitable concentrations the copolymers can form micelles to prolong circulation in the blood and bind to non-transferrin bound iron. The micelles then break up in cells in the presence of oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide and are cleared from the body by the liver or kidney route.

The copolymers include a polyhydroxamic acid-containing block and a polyferrocenyl block. They can be prepared by standard peptide synthesis or polymerization methods.
P140395US02