Technologies

Pharmaceuticals & Vitamin D

Most Recent Inventions

Nylon-3 Polymers to Treat Fungal Infections

UW–Madison researchers have found that nylon-3 polymers developed in their lab display potent antifungal activity against a broad spectrum of common fungal pathogens, with minimal toxicity towards mammalian cells. The polymers have some activity alone, and when used in combination with existing drugs provide synergistic effects against Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus strains, including some resistant strains.

Synergistic combination offers efficacy with significantly reduced amounts of drug and corresponding toxicity, which could potentially expand the relevant patient population.

The polymers were designed to resemble host-defense peptides (HDPs), which are natural molecules that exhibit antimicrobial activities.
P170021US02

Analogs of Diptoindonesin G for Breast Cancer Drug Development

UW–Madison researchers have synthesized analogs of Dip G that have shown a greater ability than the parent molecule to decrease ERα expression and stabilize ERβ in cultured breast cancer cells. The compounds are active for ameliorating, attenuating and halting the growth/metastasis of breast cancers.
P170010US02

Efficient In Vitro Assay for Antigen-Specific Tolerance

Building on their work, UW–Madison researchers have now developed a T cell-bound cytokine (T-CBC) assay for detecting and quantifying regulatory T cells specific to self-antigens or donor alloantigens. The new method comprises (a) culturing the subject’s T cells for 24 hours in the presence of one or more target antigens and (b) analyzing the cultured T cells for expression of a marker (EBi3; TGFβ/LAP) indicative of antigen-specific immune suppression.
P160186US02

New and More Potent UGM Inhibitors for Treating Tuberculosis, Other Microbial Infections

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new set of UGM inhibitors to fight tuberculosis and other diseases caused by microbial infections. The compounds feature an N-acylsulfonamide motif and are more potent in vitro than inhibitors previously identified by the researchers.
P160093US02

Improved Influenza B Virus Replication for Vaccine Development

UW–Madison researchers led by Yoshihiro Kawaoka and Gabriele Neumann have identified growth enhancing mutations that increase the yield of influenza B viruses, potentially enabling more rapid and cost-effective vaccine production.

Virus libraries were generated for each lineage (B/Victoria and B/Yamagata) and passaged in cultured cells to identify several mutations in the ‘internal’ genes of influenza B viruses that confer high-yield in cultured cells and/or embryonated chicken embryos. The use of one or more of these mutations in vaccine virus master strains results in higher viral titers (e.g., 108 PFU/mL or more) in cultured cells and/or embryonated chicken eggs.
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Most Recent Patents

Provoking Anti-Tumor Immune Response with Rhamnose

UW–Madison researchers have developed L-rhamnose antigen-lipid conjugates for provoking anti-tumor immune responses in humans and other animals. The conjugates can be inserted into tumor cell membranes where they attract cancer-fighting cytotoxic T cells.

The conjugates contain at least two L-rhamnose moieties connected to a lipid (such as DPoPE) via a standard linker. They are structured to invade tumor cell membranes and display antigen on the cell surface. The new conjugates could be combined with other chemotherapeutic agents and administered as a pharmaceutical injection or ointment.
P120290US02

Peptides to Treat Alzheimer’s Disease

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new strategy to design peptides that could be turned into therapeutics to treat or halt the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. The cyclized (ring-shaped) peptides are derived from transthyretin (TTR), a protein found in cerebrospinal fluid that is known to bind to Aβ and inhibit its toxicity in vitro and in vivo. The new peptides mimic both the sequence and the hairpin structure of transthyretin’s Aβ binding domain.
P140391US02

Stable Collagen Mimics

UW-Madison researchers have developed several new collagen mimics that use steric, rather than stereoelectronic, effects to achieve increased stability. The collagen mimics consist of a tripeptide unit with the formula (Xaa-Yaa-Gly)n, where either Xaa or Yaa is a bulky, non-electron withdrawing, 4-substituted proline derivative that contains an alkyl or thiol group, and n is a positive integer of at least 3.

Replacing a proline derivative at the Xaa or Yaa position results in steric effects that increase the stability of the helix. Specifically, three collagen variants that are more stable than native collagen are (Pro-Mep-Gly)7, (mep-Pro-Gly)7 and (mep-Mep-Gly)7, where Mep is (2S,4S)-4-methylproline and mep is (2S,4R)-4-methylproline. In addition, a fluoroproline may be substituted at the Xaa or Yaa position to further increase the strength and stability of the collagen.
P06406US