Through Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,500 patented technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

New Inventions

Treating and Preventing Restenosis with Leukemia Drug

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new approach to treat and prevent restenosis using a drug originally designed to fight leukemia. The researchers discovered that the generic drug idarubicin inhibited the proliferation of smooth muscle cells while having no negative impact on endothelial healing.

Drug-eluting stents and other medical devices containing idarubicin (or an analog) could be administered prior to or following a vascular procedure like angioplasty.
P130091US02

Kit Predicts Twinning in Cattle

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a genetic test to determine the likelihood a cow or a bull’s female progeny will produce twin offspring. The test is based on the presence or absence of the ‘trio’ haplotype, which is a set of three genetic markers on bovine chromosome 10 (BTA10). In combination, these markers suggest a cow or bull has a higher propensity for twinning.
P130303US02

Phosphine Ligands Made Cheaper, Better

UW–Madison researchers have developed methods for synthesizing novel classes of chiral phosphine ligands via enantioselective copper-catalyzed halogenation. The process is rapid and flexible, and also can be used to streamline the preparation of known phosphines.

The researchers previously described their ‘recycling’ method for use with aromatic compounds. Now, they have rendered the process enantioselective using an asymmetric bidentate phosphine ligand to produce scaffolds with high enantiomeric purity.

In essence, the use of the phosphine ligand helps form a chiral center in a complex product that is otherwise costly or impossible to create.
P130268US02

Treating Fungal Infections with New Forazoline Compounds

UW–Madison researchers have developed antifungal compounds isolated from Actinomadura, a bacterium found in a species of sea squirt. After extensive chemical isolation and characterization, the researchers identified a new class of compounds called ‘Forazolines’ that possess antifungal activity. Forazoline A was shown to be effective against Candida albicans in a mouse model.
P130274US02

Gene Controls Flowering Time in Corn

The researchers now have found a gene in maize that affects flowering time. By modulating this gene, GRMZM2G171659, the onset of flowering in maize may be delayed or accelerated. Standard vector and transgenic methods can be employed to overexpress or suppress the gene, or introduce it into new crop lines.

The gene was identified by studying more than 500 different maize lines. The researchers mapped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) correlating to early or late flowering traits. A large concentration of such SNPs was located in GRMZM2G171659, a transcription factor on chromosome 3. The gene was of previously unknown function in corn.
P130256US02
View More

New Patents

Cleaving Double-Stranded DNA at User-Chosen Sites

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method of using Ref to cleave double-stranded DNA at any desired target sequence. The researchers determined that Ref is a novel HNH class and RecA-dependent endonuclease. They have shown that Ref, in combination with RecA and a single-stranded DNA targeting oligonucleotide, can specifically cause cleavage of double-stranded DNA at a site complementary to the oligonucleotide.
P100286US02

Combined Keyboard and System for Improved Accessibility to Electronics

UW–Madison researchers have developed an extension to the EZ Access set of design guidelines, techniques and hardware components. Compact EZ Access keys and functionality can be incorporated into existing or new public information and transaction machines to provide both standard and special keyboard behaviors needed by people with different disabilities. The system incorporates the EZ UP and DOWN, EZ ACTION, EZ BACK and NEXT and EZ HELP buttons of the original EZ Access system into a typical keyboard to improve accessibility of the system and add convenience to users without disabilities. These buttons enhance the functionality of the original arrow and enter keys of a keyboard to allow easy navigation by page, screen or element, while maintaining typical functionalities such as moving the text cursor and typing carriage returns.
P08093US

Bone Tissue Regeneration System That Provides Spatial and Temporal Control Over the Release of Growth Factors

UW–Madison researchers have developed a tissue regeneration system that utilizes porous scaffolds to localize and temporally control the release of multiple growth factors.  In this system, porous beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) templates are coated with one or more extracellular matrix layers.  The layers include at least one thin, degradable mineral layer that is similar to bone mineral.  Because the coating process does not require high temperatures or organic solvents, biologically active growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) can be incorporated in the layers. 

To control dissolution order, and ultimately, delivery of the biologically active molecules, multiple distinct layers are deposited on the β-TCP scaffold.  Each layer may contain one or more active biomolecules and is designed to dissolve at a separate rate. As the matrix material gradually breaks down, the growth factors are delivered sequentially.  This provides temporal control of growth factor signaling, thereby directing the activities of associated cells, to enable the growth of new bone tissue.
P09200US
View More