Through Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,600 patented technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

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New Inventions

Generic Drug to Treat and Prevent Macular Degenerative Diseases

UW–Madison researchers have identified a new treatment option for a number of macular degenerative diseases including AMD, Stargardt’s disease and juvenile macular dystrophy.

The researchers found that a class of compounds called acid sphingomyelinase inhibitors can be used to fight retinal disorders associated with abnormal accumulations of lipofuscin (a cellular waste product), cholesterol or increased inflammation. One such inhibitor, generic name desipramine, is currently sold on the market as an antidepressant. Other acid sphingomyelinase inhibitors also may be suitable.
P140282US02

More Potent UGM Inhibitors for Treating Tuberculosis and Other Microbial Infections

UW–Madison researchers and collaborators have identified a potent set of UGM inhibitors that may help fight tuberculosis and other diseases caused by microbial infections. The compounds contain a bicyclic triazolo thiadiazine core with diversified aromatic substituents. They were identified by virtually screening a database of nearly five million commercially available compounds.

The molecules inhibit the growth of microorganisms that depend on UGM to incorporate Galf residues. They also diminish the virulence of pathogenic microorganisms, such as M. tuberculosis, M. smegmatis and Klebsiella pneumonia, that rely on UGM.
P140379US02

Treating Absence Epilepsy with Ganaxolone

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method for treating absence epilepsy with the drug ganaxolone, a synthetic neurosteroid analog that modulates GABAA receptors. The drug has shown promise for treating other forms of epilepsy but has not been recommended for absence epilepsy until now.

The researchers have found that in low doses the drug provides an optimal amount of tonic inhibition that restores function and reduces symptoms in a mouse model. The drug may be particularly useful for treating young patients whose condition is characterized by a reduction in tonic inhibition.
P140051US02

Combination Therapy Kills Cancer Cells

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new cancer treatment that combines a TRAIL receptor agonist with the diabetes drug metformin. Metformin sensitizes even resistant cancer cells to the TRAIL receptor agonists (e.g., lexatumumab) that induce cell death.

Metformin is attractive because its safety has been established over decades in diabetic patients worldwide. As such, there seem to be few barriers to its clinical implementation as a cancer therapeutic in combination with TRAIL receptor agonists. Metformin is commercially available as Glucophage® or in generic form.
P140221US02

New System for Producing Fungal Secondary Metabolites

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new system for producing fungal secondary metabolites using test plasmids and a genetically modified strain of Aspergillus nidulans (TPMW2.3). The strain begins producing secondary metabolites when a gene promoter in the plasmid is triggered by culture conditions. This allows researchers to induce or repress production.
P150029US01
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New Patents

Photovoltaic Capacitor for Direct Solar Energy Conversion and Storage

UW–Madison researchers have developed a two-electrode bio-inspired photovoltaic capacitor that can directly convert and store solar energy in a single structure. The device includes a transparent electrode and a second electrode disposed opposite from the transparent electrode. The structure features an electrolyte slurry containing semiconducting particles along with particles of low ionic diffusivity. This medium exhibits a combination of photovoltaic and ferroelectric properties. The slurry is sandwiched between the transparent electrode and a membrane of low ionic diffusivity adjacent to the negative electrode.

To harvest energy, incident photons excite the electrons within the semiconducting layer and holes in the electrode to generate electron-hole pairs via the photovoltaic effect of solar energy being absorbed. The electrons attract ions to the cathode electrode, creating a concentration gradient across the device. The device is charged using this process until a saturated electric potential difference is reached. The diffusion force of the ions and electric field are counter-balanced and maintain a stable electrical double layer across the two electrodes.
P100342US01

Electrodes with Low-Cost Replaceable Tips

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new electrode design incorporating disposable tips. The tips can have a snapping mechanism or embedded magnet that attaches to the main shaft of the electrode. An insulating material seals the connection against any liquid. The tips may be modified with other entities such as nanoparticles, enzymes and antibodies.
P120016US02

Reusable Virtual Substrates for Growing Semiconductor Devices

UW–Madison researchers have developed improved virtual substrates using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). HVPE is a well-known technique that enables thick layers of semiconductor to be grown in short periods of time.

The virtual substrates comprise several layers. The underlying GaAs substrate has a certain lattice constant. Over this, an MBL is grown via the HVPE process. The MBL is sufficiently thick to avoid warping. It is compositionally graded so that its lattice constant matches the underlying substrate, but transitions to a different lattice constant at its surface where the semiconductor device will be grown.

The MBL surface can be polished and reused to grow multiple semiconductor devices.
P130206US01
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