Through Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,500 patented technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

New Inventions

Predicting Male Fertility in Cattle

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a method for predicting whether a sperm sample will have high or low fertility based on average sperm head brightness. Generally, samples that exhibit brighter DNA staining have lower fertility.

In the process, a fresh or frozen sample is stained with DNA-binding fluorescent dye and imaged with a microscope. The brightness of the sperm head is averaged and compared with samples of known fertility.
P130280US02

Thermogel for Combination Drug Delivery

UW–Madison researchers have developed hydrogels for delivering drug combinations to cancer patients. The gel is made of a solution of heat-sensitive, biodegradable block copolymers (PLGA-PEG-PLGA) that turn semisolid at body temperature.

The gel can contain a combination of therapeutic agents like rapamycin, paclitaxel and 17-AAG. After being administered to a patient, the gel releases the drugs at a controlled rate, and then biodegrades into nontoxic fragments.
P130338US03

Treating and Preventing Restenosis with Leukemia Drug

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new approach to treat and prevent restenosis using a drug originally designed to fight leukemia. The researchers discovered that the generic drug idarubicin inhibited the proliferation of smooth muscle cells while having no negative impact on endothelial healing.

Drug-eluting stents and other medical devices containing idarubicin (or an analog) could be administered prior to or following a vascular procedure like angioplasty.
P130091US02

Kit Predicts Twinning in Cattle

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a genetic test to determine the likelihood a cow or a bull’s female progeny will produce twin offspring. The test is based on the presence or absence of the ‘trio’ haplotype, which is a set of three genetic markers on bovine chromosome 10 (BTA10). In combination, these markers suggest a cow or bull has a higher propensity for twinning.
P130303US02

Phosphine Ligands Made Cheaper, Better

UW–Madison researchers have developed methods for synthesizing novel classes of chiral phosphine ligands via enantioselective copper-catalyzed halogenation. The process is rapid and flexible, and also can be used to streamline the preparation of known phosphines.

The researchers previously described their ‘recycling’ method for use with aromatic compounds. Now, they have rendered the process enantioselective using an asymmetric bidentate phosphine ligand to produce scaffolds with high enantiomeric purity.

In essence, the use of the phosphine ligand helps form a chiral center in a complex product that is otherwise costly or impossible to create.
P130268US02
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New Patents

Blue-Green Phytochrome-Based Fluorophores with Strong Fluorescence

UW–Madison researchers have created unique blue-green fluorophores with increased fluorescence.  These fluorescent molecules were created by targeted mutation of particular amino acid residues in the phytochrome domain from wild type cyanobacteria such as Thermosynechococcus elongatus.  They have several advantages over currently used reporters such as GFP or luciferase, including their thermostability and small size.  Additionally, different fluorophores can be used to “fine tune” the excitation/emission to a particular wavelength to meet the needs of a specific system or experiment.
P08462US02

Synthesis of Low-Cost, High-Density DNA Microarrays

UW-Madison researchers have developed a system and method for synthesizing DNA microarrays using a device that includes a reduction optics assembly and a target assembly. These new components incorporate image reduction and precision stage motion into the synthesis process, increasing the density of the DNA chip to 25 times the density of a traditional microarray while maintaining the cost per feature. As a result, the system offers a significant reduction in the cost of DNA microarrays by increasing the amount of information contained within the microarray while keeping the consumables necessary for the process constant when compared to similar technologies.
P08067US

Lignin-Metal Complex Formation to Enhance Biofuel Production Processes

UW-Madison researchers have developed a method of cellulose hydrolysis using metal compounds to prevent the non-productive adsorption of enzymes by lignin during biofuel production. Metal compounds such as ferrous, magnesium and calcium compounds are used to form lignin-metal complexes. The formation of the lignin-metal complex prevents adsorption of enzymes by deactivating the non-productive adsorption sites on lignin. As a result, more enzymes are available for efficient cellulose saccharification. The formation of a lignin-metal complex allows a pretreatment step with no high-volume wash involved, reducing the energy and water costs associated with the biofuel production process.
P100184US02
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