Through Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,500 patented technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

New Inventions

Predicting Male Fertility in Cattle

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a method for predicting whether a sperm sample will have high or low fertility based on average sperm head brightness. Generally, samples that exhibit brighter DNA staining have lower fertility.

In the process, a fresh or frozen sample is stained with DNA-binding fluorescent dye and imaged with a microscope. The brightness of the sperm head is averaged and compared with samples of known fertility.
P130280US02

Thermogel for Combination Drug Delivery

UW–Madison researchers have developed hydrogels for delivering drug combinations to cancer patients. The gel is made of a solution of heat-sensitive, biodegradable block copolymers (PLGA-PEG-PLGA) that turn semisolid at body temperature.

The gel can contain a combination of therapeutic agents like rapamycin, paclitaxel and 17-AAG. After being administered to a patient, the gel releases the drugs at a controlled rate, and then biodegrades into nontoxic fragments.
P130338US03

Treating and Preventing Restenosis with Leukemia Drug

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new approach to treat and prevent restenosis using a drug originally designed to fight leukemia. The researchers discovered that the generic drug idarubicin inhibited the proliferation of smooth muscle cells while having no negative impact on endothelial healing.

Drug-eluting stents and other medical devices containing idarubicin (or an analog) could be administered prior to or following a vascular procedure like angioplasty.
P130091US02

Kit Predicts Twinning in Cattle

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a genetic test to determine the likelihood a cow or a bull’s female progeny will produce twin offspring. The test is based on the presence or absence of the ‘trio’ haplotype, which is a set of three genetic markers on bovine chromosome 10 (BTA10). In combination, these markers suggest a cow or bull has a higher propensity for twinning.
P130303US02
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New Patents

Electrically Small, Super-Directive Antennas Inspired by Insect Anatomy

A UW–Madison researcher has developed an electrically small array that converts super-resolving antennas to super-directive antennas by utilizing a phase shifter. The resolution enhancement increases the total amount of collected power and the overall signal-to-noise output.

The receiver system includes two antennas and a processing circuit with a differential phase shifter (DPS). The second antenna receives a signal, which then is phase shifted as a function of its angle of incidence relative to the array’s boresight axis. An output signal can be configured by combining the phase-shifted signal with the first antenna’s original signal.

Three distinct DPS methods can achieve the same result. Active DPS can be implemented using a mixer, filters, amplifiers and voltage controlled phase shifter. Direct DPS is another analog process, while digital DPS samples and processes the antenna signals digitally.
P120184US01

More Efficient and Reliable High Power Quantum Cascade Lasers

UW–Madison researchers have developed a design to reduce threshold-current density and virtually suppress electron leakage using certain multiquantum well structures in the active regions of QCL devices. The structures are designed to work reliably over long periods of time at high efficiency and power (i.e., watt range) during quasi-continuous or continuous wave (CW) operation.

Known methods may be used to fabricate the semiconductor structure and laser devices and to form the electron injector, active region and electron extractor. The active region features a series of quantum wells and barriers of various alloy compositions. The energies of the first and second barrier in the active region are less than the third barrier.
P120315US01

Multilayered Film for Delivering Proteins and Other Small Molecules into Cells

UW-Madison researchers have developed a new way of delivering proteins and other small molecules into cells. This approach uses a cationic “anchor” to improve incorporation of proteins into multilayered films.

Before the protein or small molecule is integrated into the film, a cationic protein transduction domain, such as nonaarginine, is attached to it. Appending short, cationic peptides or oligomers to proteins can facilitate their layer-by-layer assembly into PEMs, as well as their uptake by cells.

Then the cationic molecule is incorporated into a polyelectrolyte multilayered film, along with anionic polymers such as sodium polystyrene sulfonate, to result in a multilayered assembly that is preferably about 80 nanometers thick. When this composition is presented to a cell, the film dissolves, delivering the molecule to the cell.
P07251US
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