Through Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,500 patented technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

New Inventions

New Amphiphiles for Manipulating Membrane Proteins

UW–Madison researchers have developed improved amphiphiles for solubilizing, isolating and characterizing membrane proteins. They can be prepared from cholic acid, deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid, which are steroids found in bile.

The new amphiphiles, called CAO, DCAO and LCAO, are effective in challenging biochemical systems, such as extraction of delicate photosynthetic superassemblies from native lipid bilayers.
P09028US02

Superabsorbent, Sustainable Aerogels

UW–Madison researchers have developed organic aerogels with excellent absorbent properties. They are made by combining a water soluble polymer and cellulose nanocrystals/nanofibers (CNFs) derived from biomass. The polymer, such as PVA (polyvinyl alcohol), is cross-linked to form a gel and then water is removed by freeze-drying. The surface of the aerogel is coated with an organosilane, making it highly water repellent and superoleophilic (‘oil loving’).
P140038US02

Predicting Male Fertility in Cattle

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a method for predicting whether a sperm sample will have high or low fertility based on average sperm head brightness. Generally, samples that exhibit brighter DNA staining have lower fertility.

In the process, a fresh or frozen sample is stained with DNA-binding fluorescent dye and imaged with a microscope. The brightness of the sperm head is averaged and compared with samples of known fertility.
P130280US02

Thermogel for Combination Drug Delivery

UW–Madison researchers have developed hydrogels for delivering drug combinations to cancer patients. The gel is made of a solution of heat-sensitive, biodegradable block copolymers (PLGA-PEG-PLGA) that turn semisolid at body temperature.

The gel can contain a combination of therapeutic agents like rapamycin, paclitaxel and 17-AAG. After being administered to a patient, the gel releases the drugs at a controlled rate, and then biodegrades into nontoxic fragments.
P130338US03

Treating and Preventing Restenosis with Leukemia Drug

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new approach to treat and prevent restenosis using a drug originally designed to fight leukemia. The researchers discovered that the generic drug idarubicin inhibited the proliferation of smooth muscle cells while having no negative impact on endothelial healing.

Drug-eluting stents and other medical devices containing idarubicin (or an analog) could be administered prior to or following a vascular procedure like angioplasty.
P130091US02
View More

New Patents

Improved Micellar Delivery System for Hydrophobic or Fluorophilic Drugs

UW-Madison researchers have created highly stable and biocompatible micelles for the delivery of hydrophobic or fluorinated therapeutic agents. These micelles are self-assembled from semi-fluorinated copolymers consisting of discrete hydrophilic, fluorophilic and hydrophobic domains. Specifically, the copolymers may include blocks of polyethylene glycol, fluorocarbon and phospholipid.

Encapsulating hydrophobic and/or fluorophilic compounds with these micelles provides enhanced solubilization, protection and stabilization as compared to conventional drug delivery methods. The fluorophilic block effectively seals the hydrophobic core, making the micelles and therapeutic agents more stable, and can be modified to selectively “tune” the release rate of the encapsulated compound.  
P06151US

Purification of Beta Casein from Milk

UW-Madison researchers have developed a novel, low-cost separation protocol for removing functional beta-casein from milk without adding unwanted by-products. This process allows a significant amount of highly soluble beta-casein to be extracted from milk, while also improving the cheese-making properties of the milk. Beta-casein is separated from other milk serum components using non-ceramic, cross-flow polymeric microfiltration membranes to form a permeate enriched in beta-casein. Milk may be cooled prior to microfiltration to enhance the separation. Beta-casein is then easily purified from this enriched permeate through demineralization. Cheese formed using the milk partially depleted of beta-casein has enhanced meltability and reduced bitterness, while the purified beta-casein exhibits improved yield, purity and solubility; excellent foaming and emulsification properties; and is suitable for use as a food product additive.
P05143US

Cranberry Variety Trade Named "Sundance," with Large Berry Size and Favorable Bud Set Traits

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new variety of cranberry with the trade name “Sundance.” This variety was developed through a cross of the “Stevens” cultivar and a seedling selection of “Ben Lear” that offers significantly improved traits over its “Ben Lear” parent. “Sundance” is superior to the predominant cranberry cultivar “Stevens” in fruit size, overall coloration, yield potential and flower bud set. Also, under high crop loads, “Sundance” tolerates high levels of fertilizer to improve yield and flower bud set without causing excessive vine growth. Researchers believe that the improved fruit quality of “Sundance,” specifically larger size and solid cell structure, will result in an improved variety for sweetened dried cranberry production.

Growers interested in this cranberry variety should license the variety from WARF and obtain vines from one of the approved propagators listed below. The license between WARF and the grower must be in place before vines can be obtained.
  • Cranberry Creek Cranberries Inc.
  • Dempze Cranberry Co.
P100154US01
View More