Through Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,500 patented technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

New Inventions

Thermogel for Combination Drug Delivery

UW–Madison researchers have developed hydrogels for delivering drug combinations to cancer patients. The gel is made of a solution of heat-sensitive, biodegradable block copolymers (PLGA-PEG-PLGA) that turn semisolid at body temperature.

The gel can contain a combination of therapeutic agents like rapamycin, paclitaxel and 17-AAG. After being administered to a patient, the gel releases the drugs at a controlled rate, and then biodegrades into nontoxic fragments.
P130338US03

Treating and Preventing Restenosis with Leukemia Drug

UW–Madison researchers have developed a new approach to treat and prevent restenosis using a drug originally designed to fight leukemia. The researchers discovered that the generic drug idarubicin inhibited the proliferation of smooth muscle cells while having no negative impact on endothelial healing.

Drug-eluting stents and other medical devices containing idarubicin (or an analog) could be administered prior to or following a vascular procedure like angioplasty.
P130091US02

Kit Predicts Twinning in Cattle

A UW–Madison researcher has developed a genetic test to determine the likelihood a cow or a bull’s female progeny will produce twin offspring. The test is based on the presence or absence of the ‘trio’ haplotype, which is a set of three genetic markers on bovine chromosome 10 (BTA10). In combination, these markers suggest a cow or bull has a higher propensity for twinning.
P130303US02

Phosphine Ligands Made Cheaper, Better

UW–Madison researchers have developed methods for synthesizing novel classes of chiral phosphine ligands via enantioselective copper-catalyzed halogenation. The process is rapid and flexible, and also can be used to streamline the preparation of known phosphines.

The researchers previously described their ‘recycling’ method for use with aromatic compounds. Now, they have rendered the process enantioselective using an asymmetric bidentate phosphine ligand to produce scaffolds with high enantiomeric purity.

In essence, the use of the phosphine ligand helps form a chiral center in a complex product that is otherwise costly or impossible to create.
P130268US02

Treating Fungal Infections with New Forazoline Compounds

UW–Madison researchers have developed antifungal compounds isolated from Actinomadura, a bacterium found in a species of sea squirt. After extensive chemical isolation and characterization, the researchers identified a new class of compounds called ‘Forazolines’ that possess antifungal activity. Forazoline A was shown to be effective against Candida albicans in a mouse model.
P130274US02
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New Patents

Genes for Xylose Fermentation, Enhanced Biofuel Production in Yeast

UW–Madison researchers have identified 10 genes in yeast that are involved in xylose fermentation. These genes could be used to create an organism that can ferment both xylose and glucose for enhanced biofuel production.
P100245US03

Steering and Tuning Lasers Formed by Nanoscale Microtubes

UW–Madison researchers have developed semiconductor microtube lasers that are wavelength-tunable and can be steered when an electromagnetic field is applied.

The microtube is a heterostructure of various group III/V alloys integrated for different purposes. The structuring involves three essential components: a strained layer to make the tube curl, an optically active lattice to emit laser light (interband or intersubband), and a grating structure to provide optical feedback. Thickness of the layers may range from five to 2000 nm.

Unlike existing lasers, the diameter of the microtube can be altered to produce different wavelengths of light. Through piezoelectric coupling or the addition of an insulating layer that leads to a change in lattice spacing, the tube can be made to expand or contract, corresponding to modulated emissions.

Additionally, the microtubes can be anchored in devices with electrodes that cause them to rise and tilt, steering the direction in which their light is given off.
P08124US01

Microfluidic Device for Capturing and Analyzing Rare Cells, Including Circulating Tumor Cells

UW-Madison researchers have developed a microfluidic device for concentrating rare cells.  The velocity of flow through the device is manipulated such that particles in suspension, such as cells, are carried to and deposited in a particular location within the device.  The flow in the region where the cells are deposited is slow, so the cells remain in the collection area without any modifications to the surfaces of the device or cells while the fluid that carried them is routed out of the device.  Because particles in suspension enter the collection region but do not leave, many particles may be captured from a relatively dilute suspension.  The cells then can be cultured, stained and imaged for analysis without being removed from the collection area, creating a gentle and efficient way to implement extensive washing and treatment protocols.
P100069US01
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