Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,700 technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

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New Inventions

Nylon-3 Polymers to Treat Fungal Infections

UW–Madison researchers have found that nylon-3 polymers developed in their lab display potent antifungal activity against a broad spectrum of common fungal pathogens, with minimal toxicity towards mammalian cells. The polymers have some activity alone, and when used in combination with existing drugs provide synergistic effects against Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus strains, including some resistant strains.

Synergistic combination offers efficacy with significantly reduced amounts of drug and corresponding toxicity, which could potentially expand the relevant patient population.

The polymers were designed to resemble host-defense peptides (HDPs), which are natural molecules that exhibit antimicrobial activities.
P170021US02

Analogs of Diptoindonesin G for Breast Cancer Drug Development

UW–Madison researchers have synthesized analogs of Dip G that have shown a greater ability than the parent molecule to decrease ERα expression and stabilize ERβ in cultured breast cancer cells. The compounds are active for ameliorating, attenuating and halting the growth/metastasis of breast cancers.
P170010US02

Physics ‘Office Hours’ educational learning platform

A physics education researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay has designed a novel and interactive app-based study aid platform for students in STEM disciplines. The platform’s interface is built around education research into how students conceptualize problems they do not understand. It is a novel tool to help students see why they are struggling with a particular problem, and what might help them solve it, rather than solving the problem for them. The team’s first working prototype, the Physics Office Hours app, has been designed for use in introductory-level college physics. The app is designed to mimic a scenario students might face during ‘office hours’ with a professor: Rather than offering an answer, the instructor guides the students through problems via a series of questions. A user-friendly online interface allows app content to be easily updated and changed over time and as more problem sets become available. In addition, the app architecture can easily be adapted to problem sets in other STEM disciplines and therefore serves as a platform technology.
T150035US01

Efficient In Vitro Assay for Antigen-Specific Tolerance

Building on their work, UW–Madison researchers have now developed a T cell-bound cytokine (T-CBC) assay for detecting and quantifying regulatory T cells specific to self-antigens or donor alloantigens. The new method comprises (a) culturing the subject’s T cells for 24 hours in the presence of one or more target antigens and (b) analyzing the cultured T cells for expression of a marker (EBi3; TGFβ/LAP) indicative of antigen-specific immune suppression.
P160186US02

Genetic Testing for Acquired Peripheral Neuropathy in Dogs

UW–Madison researchers have identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that is predictive of APN syndrome in dogs, based on a genome-wide association study. Using a population of Labrador retrievers (56 cases and 26 controls), the researchers have shown that a SNP on CFA1 tags the causal variant for APN in the Labrador retriever breed.
P160048US02
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New Patents

Improved Method to Produce Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells for a Robust Human Blood-Brain Barrier Model

UW–Madison researchers have devised a novel method for reproducibly and efficiently growing human BMECs from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), which include both induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) and embryonic stem cells (ESCs). The BMECs have characteristic BBB properties, such as the expression of well-organized tight junctions and high transendothelial resistance. They can be used to create high-fidelity in vitro human BBB models.

The hPSCs are grown on a suitable matrix, such as Matrigel-coated plates, and subjected to an unconditioned medium. After several days, endothelial cell medium is added. Finally, other signals needed for further maturation of the BMECs are provided, and the cells are tested for BBB properties. Flow cytometry may be used to quantify cell development.
P100219US02

New Electrostatic Motor Design Simplifies Manufacturing

UW–Madison researchers have developed a versatile design for large-scale electrostatic machines. The new design features circular rows of pegs attached to plates and immersed in dielectric fluid. The pegs come in and out of alignments as the plates rotate. The shape, length and positioning of the pegs can be varied as needed to achieve higher torque.
P150105US01

Automated Radiation Treatment Planning to Improve Consistency

UW–Madison researchers have developed a method for generating high quality radiation treatment plans for every patient. In the new method, planning objectives are automatically determined based on patient data, e.g., target regions and organs at risk (OARs). So-called ‘physical objectives’ take into account the physical constraints and capabilities of the particular therapy system being used.

This approach is contrary to traditional planning schemes based on dose-volume histograms, which fail to convey the same spatial information attainable with the new method.
P140327US01
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