Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,900 technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

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New Inventions

New Hormone Analogs for Treating Hypoparathyroidism

UW–Madison researchers have developed backbone-modified analogs of PTH(1-34). The analogs exhibit advantageous properties; they are biased toward Gs activation/cAMP production relative to β arrestin recruitment.

The analogs were generated via an unconventional strategy in which the backbone of a natural PTHR-1 agonist was altered, rather than the side-chain complement. More specifically, selected α-amino acid residues were systemically replaced with either β-amino acid residues or with unnatural D-stereoisomer α-amino acid residues.

The researchers have shown that backbone-modification can rapidly identify potent agonists with divergent receptor-state selectivity patterns relative to a prototype peptide.
P180053US02

Industrial Furnace With Flameless Combustion and Impingement Flow for Increased Efficiency, Reduced Emissions and Intensified Heat Transfer

An assistant professor of mechanical engineering technology and inventor from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh has developed an industrial natural gas furnace and oven design that combines flameless combustion with high velocity impingement gas and air jets directed toward the product being heated. This novel combination has the potential to provide advantages over conventional technology that include higher energy efficiency, uniform temperature distribution, reduced NOx emissions, and intensified convection heat transfer. The design also has the potential to increase productivity by allowing more material to be processed within the same combustion area. This innovative system can be used for production of new furnaces as well as retrofitting existing installations.
T170023US01

Low Maintenance Snowmobile Ski Design that Increases Traction, Maneuverability and Safety on Paved Surfaces

Students from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay in partnership with UW-Platteville Senior Design have developed a snowmobile ski that offers improved steering and traction on pavement and other hard surfaces. The design incorporates a fixed wheel and runner system, which provides steering control when rolling on pavement and concrete yet allows the skis to function properly when driving on snow and ice surfaces. The design has been refined through multiple prototype iterations and has passed testing for mobility on hard surfaces, traction on ice, and functionality on snow. The present design increases maneuverability on pavement and requires less maintenance when compared with snowmobiles that are currently on the market.
T170041US01

Modified Newton’s Cradle Demonstrating Mechanical Impedance

A Physics professor and inventor at the University of Wisconsin – Whitewater has developed a modified Newton’s Cradle that allows the user to visualize and test the concept of mechanical impedance in addition to momentum and energy conservation. The traditional version of Newton’s cradle has a cradle of identical metal spheres. In this modified and improved device, the user is able to interchange these spheres with ones of varying mass and material composition. By allowing the user to strategically align and create a unique cradle, they have the opportunity to visualize mechanical impedance. For example, a sphere with a small mass would have the ability to strike the cradle and lift a sphere of greater mass on the opposite side if the spheres in-between had a gradient of increasing mass themselves. The possibility of changing a sphere at any position in the cradle allows for an exceptionally large number of possible experiments and would overall lead to an enhanced understanding of the aforementioned physics concepts, something a traditional cradle device does not provide for.
T170047US02

Novel Transparent Dilatant Materials Comprised of Single Chemical Component

Research from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point has resulted in the synthesis of a series of materials exhibiting a range of dilatant properties. The materials show good transparency and are chemically uniform (e.g. consisting of a single chemical component). The degree of dilatancy is easily controlled by adjusting the compositions of the materials. Due to the range of dilatant properties, good transparency, and single chemical component nature of the dilatant samples, these materials show significant promise for novel uses in protective equipment and other areas related to impact protection, especially where transparency is desirable.
T170056WO01
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New Patents

Precise Restarts for Handling Interrupts in Parallel Processing

UW–Madison researchers have developed an easier method for capturing the precise architectural state of a multiprocessor system. Their approach uses computation checkpoints that hold simplified information sufficient for ‘precisely restarting’ after an interrupt, even though the checkpoints may not technically represent the actual state of the system at the time of interrupt.

Specifically, as the multiple processors execute different parts of a program, the method enforces a consistent order in the commitment of their results. An architectural state is determined by marking interrupts with respect to this commitment order. For example, all preceding executions in the order may be committed, while all later executions are squashed. In this way, ‘precise restartability’ rather than interruptability is used to reflect a total ordering of instructions that is consistent with data flow and sequence.

After an interrupt is handled, execution of the parallel portions is resumed from the architectural state.
P130018US01

Foot Harness for Patients Relearning to Walk

UW–Madison researchers have developed a first-of-its-kind foot strap that can attach to training equipment. The strap fits easily and securely around a patient’s own shoe without impeding his or her normal stride. The strap features a safety release mechanism and electronic sensor to stop the exercise if the patient loses balance.
P150292US01

Green Method for Producing 1,5-Pentanediol Slashes Catalyst Cost 10,000-fold

Seeking a commercially viable alternative, UW–Madison researchers have developed a new route for producing 1,5-PD from biomass-derived THFA. Their three-step process is orders of magnitude cheaper than competing methods, green and exceeds 90 percent overall yields.

More specifically the new method includes hydration of THFA to dihydropyran, conversion to 2-hydroxy-tetrahydropyran (no need for a mineral acid catalyst) and subsequent production of 1,5-PD. The entire method can be conducted entirely in the absence of noble metal catalysts.
P160103US01
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