Technologies

Explore WARF Inventions and Patents

WARF Technologies

WARF’s portfolio of more than 1,900 technologies covers a wide range of categories, including analytical instrumentation, pharmaceuticals, food products, agriculture, research tools, medical devices, pluripotent stem cells, clean technology, information technology and semiconductors.

Information summaries, which describe each technology and its applications, benefits, inventors and patent status, can be downloaded, printed and shared by clicking on the technology category links to the left on this page.

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New Inventions

New Hormone Analogs for Treating Hypoparathyroidism

UW–Madison researchers have developed backbone-modified analogs of PTH(1-34). The analogs exhibit advantageous properties; they are biased toward Gs activation/cAMP production relative to β arrestin recruitment.

The analogs were generated via an unconventional strategy in which the backbone of a natural PTHR-1 agonist was altered, rather than the side-chain complement. More specifically, selected α-amino acid residues were systemically replaced with either β-amino acid residues or with unnatural D-stereoisomer α-amino acid residues.

The researchers have shown that backbone-modification can rapidly identify potent agonists with divergent receptor-state selectivity patterns relative to a prototype peptide.
P180053US02

Industrial Furnace With Flameless Combustion and Impingement Flow for Increased Efficiency, Reduced Emissions and Intensified Heat Transfer

An assistant professor of mechanical engineering technology and inventor from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh has developed an industrial natural gas furnace and oven design that combines flameless combustion with high velocity impingement gas and air jets directed toward the product being heated. This novel combination has the potential to provide advantages over conventional technology that include higher energy efficiency, uniform temperature distribution, reduced NOx emissions, and intensified convection heat transfer. The design also has the potential to increase productivity by allowing more material to be processed within the same combustion area. This innovative system can be used for production of new furnaces as well as retrofitting existing installations.
T170023US01

Soybeans with Increased Resistance to Sclerotinia Stem Rot and Drought Tolerance

UW–Madison researchers have demonstrated that knocking down expression of a specific soybean respiratory burst oxidase homolog protein (GmRBOH-VI) leads to enhanced resistance to S. sclerotiorum and confers drought tolerance.

Using protein sequence similarity searches, the researchers identified seventeen GmRBOHs and studied their contribution to Sclerotinia disease development, drought tolerance and nodulation. Transcript analysis of all seventeen GmRBOHs revealed that out of the six identified groups, group VI (GmRBOH-VI) was specifically and drastically induced following S. sclerotiorum challenge. Virus-induced gene silencing of GMRBOH-VI resulted in enhanced resistance to the fungus and, coincidently, drought stress.

Based on these discoveries, the researchers have developed modified soybeans and production methods available for licensing.
P170294US03

Low Maintenance Snowmobile Ski Design that Increases Traction, Maneuverability and Safety on Paved Surfaces

Students from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay in partnership with UW-Platteville Senior Design have developed a snowmobile ski that offers improved steering and traction on pavement and other hard surfaces. The design incorporates a fixed wheel and runner system, which provides steering control when rolling on pavement and concrete yet allows the skis to function properly when driving on snow and ice surfaces. The design has been refined through multiple prototype iterations and has passed testing for mobility on hard surfaces, traction on ice, and functionality on snow. The present design increases maneuverability on pavement and requires less maintenance when compared with snowmobiles that are currently on the market.
T170041US01

Modified Newton’s Cradle Demonstrating Mechanical Impedance

A Physics professor and inventor at the University of Wisconsin – Whitewater has developed a modified Newton’s Cradle that allows the user to visualize and test the concept of mechanical impedance in addition to momentum and energy conservation. The traditional version of Newton’s cradle has a cradle of identical metal spheres. In this modified and improved device, the user is able to interchange these spheres with ones of varying mass and material composition. By allowing the user to strategically align and create a unique cradle, they have the opportunity to visualize mechanical impedance. For example, a sphere with a small mass would have the ability to strike the cradle and lift a sphere of greater mass on the opposite side if the spheres in-between had a gradient of increasing mass themselves. The possibility of changing a sphere at any position in the cradle allows for an exceptionally large number of possible experiments and would overall lead to an enhanced understanding of the aforementioned physics concepts, something a traditional cradle device does not provide for.
T170047US02
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New Patents

Enhanced Drug Delivery Across the Blood-Brain Barrier: pH-Dependent Antibodies Targeting the Transferrin Receptor

UW–Madison researchers have developed several new single-chain antibody fragments to the transferrin receptor which exhibit increased dissociation at pH 5.5. Such targeting antibodies could have immense potential for drug delivery into and across target cells including cancer cells and the BBB.

Unlike other anti-TfR antibodies in development for cancer or brain delivery, the new antibodies have been endowed with pH-sensitivity resulting in differential trafficking and increased intracellular accumulation up to 2.6 times their wild-type parent.
P150370US02

Zip-Lignin™ Assay: An Analysis and Validation Tool

The researchers have now developed the most sensitive assay to date for detecting and quantifying Zip-lignin monomers in plants. They modified an existing lignin assay known as DFRC (Derivatization Followed by Reductive Cleavage) that has been in use for almost a decade. They incorporated several new features to improve the sensitivity of the assay, including extended incubation periods and an additional purification step.

The modified DFRC assay is currently the only known technique capable of determining levels of monolignol ester conjugates in plant lignin.
P150118US02

Enhanced Biomass Digestion with Wood Wasp Bacteria

UW–Madison researchers have derived preparations from ActE secretions that highly degrade lignocellulose. The bacteria can be obtained from Sirex noctilio wasps and grown on a substrate containing mostly cellulose, hemicelluloses, xylan, wood or non-wood biomass, and chitin. The substrate may be pretreated for better results. The ActE are grown aerobically to maximize the secretion of both oxidative and hydrolytic enzymes capable of rapid deconstruction of matter. The secretions can be purified and added directly to biomass slurry.
P110314US03
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